PRE-CONGRESS WORKSHOPS AUGUST 31

All pre-congress workshops are full day, 09:00-17:00, and have an additional cost.

Pre-congress Workshop #1

This workshop might be fully booked – if so, it will not show up in the registration form!

Professor Roz Shafran

Title: Cognitive-Behavioural Treatment of Clinical Perfectionism

 

Pre-congress Workshop #2

This workshop might be fully booked – if so, it will not show up in the registration form!

Associate Professor Judith Beck

Title: Cognitive Therapy for Personality Disorders

 

Pre-congress Workshop #3

Associate Professor Anne Marie Albano

Title: Anxiety in Adolescents and Emerging Adults: Prevalence, phenomenology, and a developmental CBT treatment model

 

Pre-congress Workshop #4

Professor Lance M. McCracken

Title: ACT, psychological flexibility, and chronic pain: A short practical workshop

 

Pre-congress Workshop #5

Stephen Barton

Title: The Newcastle Model of CBT Supervision:  Integrating Practical Skills with a Conceptual Framework

 

Pre-congress Workshop #6

Professor Susan Bögels

Title: Mindful Parenting in mental health care and “preventive” settings

 

Pre-congress Workshop #7

Professor Lars-Göran Öst

Title: One-session treatment of specific phobias 

 

Pre-congress Workshop #8

Professor JoAnne Dahl
Co-Leader: Magnus Johansson, Uppsala University, Sweden

Title: Workshop on the prevention of prejudice: Using Perspective taking to develop empathy and psychological flexibility

 

 

Pre-congress Workshop #9

This workshop might be fully booked – if so, it will not show up in the registration form!

Professor David M Clark

Title: An Update on Cognitive Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder in Adults and Adolescents

 

Pre-congress Workshop #10

This workshop might be fully booked – if so, it will not show up in the registration form!

Professor Emily A. Holmes

Title: MENTAL IMAGERY: Cognitive Science and Cognitive Therapy

Pre-congress Workshop #11

Professor Patricia van Oppen
Together with Jenneke Wiersma, Philipp Klein and Eva-Lotte Brakemeier

Title: Cognitive Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy (CBASP) for the treatment of chronic depression.

 

Pre-congress Workshop #12

Professor Christof Loose

Title: Schematherapy for Children, Adolescents, and Parents

 

Pre-congress Workshop #13

Professor Edward Watkins

Title: Rumination-focused CBT as a transdiagnostic treatment for depression and anxiety

 

IN-CONGRESS WORKSHOPS SEPTEMBER 1-3

Please note that you can only register for a maximum of one of the free in-congress workshops as we want many to be able to take part. You can add as many registrations as you like for workshops that have an additional cost.

Thursday September 1, 8:30 – 12:00

Additional Cost

Tara O’Donoghue
Workshop Co-Leader: Lisa Williams. Anxiety Disorder Residential Unit, London, UK

This workshop might be fully booked – if so, it will not show up in the registration form!

Title: Building Shame Resilience in OCD and BDD populations

 

Professor Per Carlbring1
Professor Gerhard Andersson2

This workshop might be fully booked – if so, it will not show up in the registration form!

Title: Internet treatment for anxiety disorders

 

Free

Shiva Thorsell
Affiliation: Altrecht Psychosomatiek Eikenboom, The Netherlands
Co-leader: Jaap Spaans, Altrecht Psychosomatiek Eikenboom, The Netherlands

Title: Perspective taking skills in the treatment of severe somatoform disorders

Read more here

 

 Dr Hannah Murray
Affiliation: Springfield Hospital, United Kingdom
Co-leader: Sharif El-Leithy, Springfield Hospital, United Kingdom

Title: Beyond reliving in PTSD treatment: Advanced skills for overcoming common obstacles in memory work

Read more here

 

 Dr Ingrid Söchting
Affiliation: University of British Columbia, Canada

Title: Group CBT for Depression in Adults

 Read more here

 

 Dr Daniel Hamiel
Affiliation: Interdisciplinary Center Herzlia, Israel

Title: From Crisis to Growth- Resilience training with children and adults to prevent psychotpathology and build life skills

 Read more here

 

Thursday September 1, 10:30 – 12:00

Free Mini Workshop

 Associate Professor Judith S Beck
Affiliation: Beck Institute for Cognitive Behavior Therapy, United States

Title: A Cognitive Behavioral Approach to Weight Loss and Maintenance

Read more here

 

Thursday September 1, 14:00 – 17:00

Additional Cost

Associate Professor Brjánn Ljótsson

This workshop might be fully booked – if so, it will not show up in the registration form!

Title: Exposure based cognitive behavior therapy for irritable bowel syndrome – theory and treatment

 

 

Lusia Stopa

This workshop might be fully booked – if so, it will not show up in the registration form!

Title: Imagery and the self: understanding how imagery maintains negative self-views and how you can use imagery to change them

 

 

Professor Anke Ehlers

This workshop might be fully booked – if so, it will not show up in the registration form!

Title: Updating Trauma Memories with Cognitive Therapy for PTSD

Professor Glenn Waller

This workshop might be fully booked – if so, it will not show up in the registration form!

Title: Cognitive-behavioural therapy for eating disorders: How to deliver evidence-based treatment in real-life clinical settings

Thursday September 1, 14:00 – 15:30

Free Mini Workshop

 Dr. Stirling Moorey
Affiliation: South London and Maudsley NHS Trust, United Kingdom

Title: CBT for cancer and life limiting illness

Read more here

 

Friday September 2, 8:30 – 12:00

Additional Cost

Riccardo Dalle Grave

Title: Residential and day hospital CBT-E based treatment for eating disorders

 

Mike Kemani

This workshop might be fully booked – if so, it will not show up in the registration form!

Title: Using Acceptance and Values in Pain Management – Integrating Core Clinical Strategies from Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in Clinical Practice

 

Professor Timothy Carey
Co-leader: Sara Tai, University of Manchester

This workshop might be fully booked – if so, it will not show up in the registration form!

Title: Making Cognitive Therapy Work: A focus on principles

Free

Dr Iftah Yovel
Affiliation: The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel

Title: Setting the Grounds for a Valued Change in ACT

Read more here

 

 Dr Frank N Ryan
Affiliation: Imperial College, United Kingdom

 Title: The Willpower Workshop: Improving outcomes in motivational and affective disorders

Read more here

 

Pietro Muratori
Affiliation: IRCCS Fondazione Stella Maris, Italy
Co-leader: Maria Helander, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Laura Ruglioni, IRCCS Fondazione Stella Maris, Italy

Title: Coping Power for children with aggressive behavioral problems

Read more here

 

 Dr Sanjay Rao
Affiliation: The Royal Ottawa Mental Health Centre & University of Ottawa, Canada

Title: Transdiagnostic Experiential CBT for Rumination

Read more here

Friday September 2, 14:00 – 17:00

Additional Cost

Erik Andersson

This workshop might be fully booked – if so, it will not show up in the registration form!

Title: CBT for OCD with comorbid Autism (adult patients)

 

 

Friday September 2, 14:00 – 15:30

Free Mini Workshop

 Dr. Robert Johansson
Affiliation: Karolinska Institutet, Sweden

Title: Writing the code for ICBT web applications: A technical demonstration of the development process

 

 

 Maria Bragesjö
Affiliation: Karolinska Insitutet, Sweden

Title: Imaginal exposure within the context of prolonged Exposure

 

Saturday September 3, 8:30 – 12:00

Additional Cost

John Swan

This workshop might be fully booked – if so, it will not show up in the registration form!

Co-leader: Marianne Liebing-Wilson. NHS Tayside and University of Dundee

Title: Cognitive Behavioural Analysis System of Psychotherapy (CBASP) for Persistent Depressive Disorder

 

 

Stirling Moorey

Title: Working with Interpersonal Process in CBT Supervision

 

 

Poul Perris

This workshop might be fully booked – if so, it will not show up in the registration form!

Title: The Art of Empathic Confrontation: How to by-pass dysfunctional coping behaviors within the therapeutic relationship

 

Free

 Dennis Pusch
Co-leader: Chantelle Klassen, Alberta Health Services, Canada
Affiliation: Alberta Health Services, Canada

Title: Developing a trauma-informed treatment option in primary care: A skills-based model for patients with adverse childhood experiences (ACEs)

Read more here

 

 

Professor Larissa Niec
Affiliation: Central Michigan University, United States
Co-leader: Professor Elizabeth Brestan, Auburn University, United States; Willemine Heiner, Mentaal Beter, The Netherlands; Mariëlle Abrahamse, de Bascule and the Academic Medical Center, the Netherlands, Central Michigan University, United States; Frederique Coelman

Title: Parent-Child Interaction Therapy: Innovative Interventions Growing From the Roots of Behavioral Theory

Read more here

 

 

 Niklas Törneke
Affiliation: NT Psykiatri, Sweden

Title: To start learning RFT

Read more here

 

 Mats Jacobson
Affiliation: Verksam Psykologi, Sweden
Co-leader: Erik Nilsson; Verksam Psykologi, Sweden

Title: The Unified Protocol for adults, adolescents and children: Emotion focused, transdiagnostic CBT

Read more here

 

 

Laura Pass
Affiliation: University of Reading, UK
Co-leader: Erik Nilsson; Göteborgs och Södra Bohusläns FoU Råd, WeMind, Verksam Psykologi, Sweden

Title: Brief Behavioural Activation for depressed adolescents

Read more here

PRE-CONGRESS WORKSHOPS AUGUST 31

All pre-congress workshops are full day, 09:00-17:00, and have an additional cost.

Pre-congress Workshop #1

Professor Roz Shafran

Affiliation: University of Reading, School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences, Reading, United Kingdom

Title: Cognitive-Behavioural Treatment of Clinical Perfectionism

 

Abstract

“Clinical perfectionism” is a highly specific construct designed to capture the type of perfectionism that can often pose problems in routine therapeutic practice. The core psychopathology of clinical perfectionism is an over evaluation of achievement and striving that causes significant adverse consequences.

Clinical perfectionism has been implicated in the maintenance of psychopathology, in particular eating disorders. A specific cognitive-behavioural intervention has been developed by the Oxford Eating Disorders Research Group for the treatment of clinical perfectionism in Axis I disorders including eating disorders, anxiety disorders and depression. A recent systematic review and meta-analysis indicates that the intervention is effective in reducing perfectionism as well as associated psychopathology.

This workshop will provide a cognitive-behavioural analysis of clinical perfectionism and the factors that contribute to its maintenance. Relevant research literature and current evidence-base for interventions will be provided.

Methods used to reverse putative maintaining mechanisms will be presented.

By the end of the day, participants will learn how to assess clinical perfectionism and determine when it may warrant a specific intervention. They will also be familiar with relevant cognitive-behavioural strategies. The workshop will be interactive and include both experiential and didactic teaching and videos. Participants will have a chance to discuss their own cases. The workshop is aimed at intermediate-advanced cognitive-behaviour therapists.

 

Scientific Background

“Clinical perfectionism” is a highly specific construct designed to capture the type of perfectionism that poses a clinical problem. The core psychopathology of clinical perfectionism is an overevaluation of achievement and striving that causes significant adverse consequences. Clinical perfectionism has been implicated in the maintenance of psychopathology, in particular eating disorders. A specific cognitive-behavioural intervention has been developed by the Oxford Eating Disorders Research Group for the treatment of clinical perfectionism in Axis I disorders including eating disorders, anxiety disorders and depression. More recently, the intervention has been enhanced by incorporating techniques used by clinical research groups in Australia. The intervention can be delivered in traditional face-to-face therapy, or in the form of guided self-help. A recent systematic review and meta-analysis indicates that the intervention is effective in reducing perfectionism as well as associated psychopathology.

 

Key Learning objectives:
  • To understand a cognitive-behavioural analysis of clinical perfectionism and the factors that contribute to its maintenance
  • To learn how to assess clinical perfectionism and determine when it may warrant a specific intervention
  • To be familiar with the cognitive-behavioural strategies used to address clinical perfectionism
  • To be aware of the relevant research literature and current evidence-base for the intervention

 

Training modalities

The workshop will be interactive and include both experiential and didactic teaching and videos. Participants will have a chance to discuss their own cases.

 

Key references
  1. Lloyd, S., Schmidt, U., Khondoker, M., & Tchanturia, K. (2015). Can psychological interventions reduce perfectionism? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, 43, 705-731
  2. Shafran, R., Egan, S., & Wade, T. (2010). Overcoming Perfectionism: A self-help guide using Cognitive Behavioural Techniques. Constable & Robinson.
  3. Shafran, R., Cooper, Z., & Fairburn, C. G. (2002). Clinical perfectionism: a cognitive- behavioural analysis. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 40, 773-791.

 

Brief Description of Workshop Leader

Roz Shafran is Chair in Translational Psychology at the Institute of Child Health, University College London. She is founder of the Charlie Waller Institute of Evidence Based Psychological Treatment and a former Wellcome Trust Career Development Fellow at the University of Oxford. Her clinical research interests focus on the development, evaluation, dissemination and implementation of cognitive behavioural treatments for eating disorders, obsessive compulsive disorder and perfectionism across the age range. She is currently working to understand and integrate evidence-based psychological treatments in young people with mental health disorders in the context of physical illness. She has provided national and international training workshops in her areas of clinical expertise, has over 100 publications, and has received an award for Distinguished Contributions to Professional Psychology from the British Psychological Society and the Marsh Award for Mental Health work.

 

Implications for Everyday Practice of CBT

The implications of this workshop is that practitioners are improved identification, assessment and treatment of a common clinical problem occurring in the context of a range of Axis 1 disorders.

 

Pre-congress Workshop #2

Associate Professor Judith Beck

Affiliation: Beck Institute for Cognitive Behavior Therapy, Philadelphia, United States

Title: Cognitive Therapy for Personality Disorders

 

Abstract

This workshop deals with the challenges of treating clients with personality disorders, clients who, for example, fail to engage in treatment, miss sessions, feel hopeless and stuck, become angry in session, engage in self-harm, use substances, blame others, avoid homework, experience continual crises, and so on. The workshop will focus on conceptualization, the therapeutic alliance, treatment planning, and the use of a variety of strategies from many different psychotherapeutic modalities within the context of the cognitive model to help clients change their thinking at both an intellectual and an emotional level to bring about enduring changes in cognition, mood, behavior, and general functioning.

 

Pre-congress Workshop #3

Associate Professor Anne Marie Albano

Affiliation: Columbia University Medical Center/New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, United States

Title: Anxiety in Adolescents and Emerging Adults: Prevalence, phenomenology, and a developmental CBT treatment model

 

Abstract

Understanding and Effectively Managing Anxiety in the Transition through Young Adulthood

Anxiety disorders are more frequent in adolescence and early adulthood than any other time in life and strong precursors for adult psychopathology. The 12-month prevalence for any DSM anxiety diagnosis for youth ages of 18-29 is 22.3%. Anxiety disorders also present with high comorbidity with other disorders, especially mood disorders.  Randomized control trials (RCT) show that there are effective treatments for anxiety disorders, one of which is Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT). The Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Study (CAMS; Walkup, Albano et al., 2008) of 488 youth (ages 7 to 17) found that acute treatment with CBT, medication, or their combination, results in significant improvement in reducing anxiety symptoms.  However, a naturalistic follow-up study of 288 CAMS participants revealed a more sobering finding, that nearly half of treatment responders had relapsed on average 6 years post-randomization, at the point of transitioning through adolescence into young adulthood (Ginsburg et al., 2014).  CBT models have several limitations: 1) the focus is mainly on symptom improvement; 2) few explicitly address problems with developmental tasks, and 3) autonomy issues (e.g., the transfer of responsibility for managing the youth’s illness from parent to patient) may persist over and above the clinical improvement. Little is known of the utility of existing interventions for remediating functional impairment and for improving the life course of an emerging adult as they move through development.

In this workshop, Dr. Albano will present the background and model for the “Launching Emerging Adult Program” (LEAP). LEAP is implemented as an age- and developmentally-appropriate treatment for anxiety and related disorders. The role of development, which has not been a primary focus of randomized trials, will be presented as a key factor in the stability of anxiety and emergence of concomitant disorders in young adults, a critical age group presenting with unique and challenging needs. Youth with anxiety disorders may be particularly challenged in launching into adulthood, as the disorder keeps adolescents and the emerging young adult dependent on family members and lagging same-age peers in achievement of age-appropriate tasks.  LEAP involves a diagnostic and functional assessment to determine goals and prescriptive treatment modules to form a personalized program of individual, group and/or family sessions. Dr. Albano will present session content and specific examples of the LEAP modules to engage parents and adolescents/young adults to address anxiety, reduce parent overprotection, and meet developmental goals. Plans for managing concomitant conditions and issues will be presented, as this age group is at high risk for the emergence of psychosis and personality pathology.  Exposure is key to the LEAP approach, for both the adolescent/young adult and for parents.  The clinical program, along with data from our clinic and case examples with emphasis on developmental issues including confidentiality, parent-adolescent engagement, and methods for breaking the cycle of overprotection will be presented and audience participation encouraged.

 

References:

Detweiler, M.F., Comer, J., Crum, K.I., & Albano, A.M. (2015).  Social anxiety in children and adolescents:  Biological, psychological, and social considerations.  In S. G. Hofmann & P. M. DiBartolo (Eds.), Social Anxiety: Clinical, developmental and social perspectives (3rd ed, pp. 254-309). Amsterdam: Academic Press.

Ginsburg, GS, Becker, EM, Keeton, CP, Sakolsky, D., Piacentini, J, Albano, AM, Compton, SN, Iyengar, S, Sullivan, K, Caporino, N, Peris, T, Birmaher, B, Rynn, M, March, J, & Kendall, PC (2014 on-line). Naturalistic follow-up of youths treated for pediatric anxiety disorders, Jan 29, JAMA Psychiatry. PMID:  24477837

Walkup, J., Albano, A.M., Piacentini, J.P., Birmaher, B., Compton, S., Sherrill, J., Ginsburg, G., Rynn, M., McCracken, J., Waslick, B., Iyengar, S., March, J.S., & Kendall, P.C. (2008).  Cognitive behavioral therapy, sertraline, or a combination for childhood anxiety.   New England Journal of Medicine, 359, 2753-2766.

 

Pre-congress Workshop #4

Professor Lance M. McCracken

Affiliation: King’s College London, London

Title: ACT, psychological flexibility, and chronic pain: A short practical workshop

 

Abstract
Scientific Background:

Whether we are a person with chronic painful symptoms or a professional health care provider it is so easy to follow our thoughts and feelings, to give them control over what we do, and even to identify with them as if they are who we are.  This is so normal that the very notion that there could be an alternative sounds strange.  What else would guide us, and control what we do, if not our thoughts and feelings?  This short workshop examines these psychological processes particularly within the context of treatment for chronic pain.  The session will include a review of theory, an update on evidence, and direct experience of practical exercises designed to appreciate and alter the influences that determine our actions.  These include influences for all of us, people seeking treatment for chronic pain (and other conditions) and people who provide this treatment.  The model presented is called psychological flexibility and the methods based on contextual behavioral science, functional contextualism, and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy.

 

Key Learning Objectives:

1. To understand the evolution of psychological approaches to chronic pain.

2. To learn to apply the psychological flexibility model to chronic pain and other physical health problems.

3. To experience and practice methods of ACT aimed at enhancing clinical delivery and treatment outcome for people with chronic pain.

 

Training Modalities:

The training will include brief lecturing, experiential exercises, small group practice and rehearsal, and some discussion.

 

Key References:

Hann, K, E. J. & McCracken, L. M. (2014). A systematic review of randomized controlled clinical trials of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for adults with chronic pain: Outcome domains, design quality, and efficacy. Journal of Contextual Behavioral science, 3, 217-227.

McCracken, L. M. & Morley, S. (2014). The psychological flexibility model: A basis for integration and progress in psychological approaches to chronic pain management. The Journal of Pain, 15, 221-234.

Scott, W., Hann, K. E. J., McCracken, L. M. (in press). A comprehensive examination of changes in psychological flexibility following Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for chronic pain. Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy doi: 10.1007/s10879-016-9328-5

 

Workshop Leader:

Lance McCracken is Professor of Behavioural Medicine at King’s College London, Psychology Department; Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience.  He is also Consultant Clinical Psychologist and Psychology Lead at the INPUT Pain Management Unit at Guy’s and St Thomas’ Hospital in London.  He has practiced and researched applications of ACT and psychological flexibility to chronic pain for more than 20 years and has delivered more than 70 training workshops on related topics.

 

Implications for Practice:

This is a practical skills workshop.  This workshop should help participants to gain greater sensitivity to “context.”  This includes both verbal cognitive aspects of context and direct experiences or environmental contingencies.  The workshop should help participants better manage the interaction of these influences on patient behavior, through a mix of experiential methods and nonconventional cognitive methods.

 

Pre-congress Workshop #5

Stephen Barton

Affiliation: Newcastle University, United Kingdom

Co-leader: Matthew Stalker, NTW Foundation Trust

Title: The Newcastle Model of CBT Supervision:  Integrating Practical Skills with a Conceptual Framework

 

Abstract:

Supervision in CBT is conceptually and procedurally complex.  Most of us learn to supervise by imitation or trial and error.  As a result there is much implicit knowledge, several procedural accounts, but few explicit formulations.  In the absence of such formulations our ability to consistently replicate best practice is limited.  In Newcastle we have tapped into the implicit knowledge of experienced CBT supervisors to develop a conceptual map of clinical supervision.  This framework identifies four interacting levels.  The first level, primary inputs, includes the context in which supervision occurs and what is brought to supervision by the supervisor and the supervisee.  The client’s impact upon supervision is recognised, as is the filtering effect of the selection and representation of therapy by the therapist.

The second level, parameter settings, outlines the characteristics of a specific supervisory project in the medium term and includes structure, the evolving relationship between supervisee and supervisor, required outputs, the material brought to supervision, and the range of roles and functions.  The third level, dynamic focus, tracks the minute-to-minute focus across a range of topics in the course of any dialogue or activity. Much of supervision is focused on case conceptualisation, technique, and the therapeutic relationship; the context, therapist/supervisee and supervisory relationship also need to be addressed.   The fourth level, learning process, concerns the stages through which supervision proceeds to enable new knowledge and skills.  Close attention to these levels yields a clearer understanding of effective supervisory practice.

 

3. Key learning objectives

By the end of the workshop, participants will 1) have developed a conceptual map of the multiple factors influencing supervision processes, 2) be able to conceptualise what works well, 3) have practised key skills for effective supervision, 4) possess heuristics that identify problem points in supervision and address them, 5) be more aware of the assumptions and beliefs that influence supervisory practice.

 

4. Training modalities

Brief didactic presentations, observing and participating in role plays, reflection on the supervisory processes observed, integration of personal experience as supervisor/supervisee.

 

5. 2-3 key references

Background reading of the supervision literature can be useful but it is preferable for participants to prepare by reflecting on their recent experience as a supervisor or supervisee.  Specifically, please reflect on occasions where supervision went particularly well or got noticeably stuck.

 

6. Brief description of workshop leader(s)

Dr Stephen Barton is Head of Training at the Newcastle CBT Centre and is an experienced CBT practitioner, supervisor and trainer.  He has had a supervisory practice for the past 15 years with supervisees at different stages of development based in a variety of healthcare settings.

 

7. Implications for everyday clinical practice of CBT

The workshop is aimed at CBT therapists wanting to step up to be supervisors, those who are already supervising and those who want to improve their supervisory practice. The workshop will ground participant’s supervisory practice in a theoretically coherent model with concrete applications.

 

Pre-congress Workshop #6

Professor Susan Bögels

Affiliation: University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Title: Mindful Parenting in mental health care and “preventive” settings

 

Abstract

Mindful Parenting (Bögels & Restifo, 2013) is a specific application of mindfulness training in a mental health care context, for parents who have (had) mental health problems that interfere with parenting, who suffer from chronic parenting stress, severe parent-child relational problems, or whose child or children have mental health problems. We also developed a “preventive” version of this program for parents with parenting stress and parenting questions or problems (Potharts & Bögels, 2015). In this workshop the theory and rationale, the program, and effects on parental and child psychopathology, parenting stress, (co)parenting, personal goals of parents, quality of life, parent-child relationships, and family functioning, of both versions of the 8 sessions mindful parenting group training, are reviewed. By means of meditation practices, in which participants place themselves in the role of parents, some of the specific mindful parenting practices can be experienced. Basic knowledge and experience with MBSR and/or MBCT is expected.

Literature:

Bögels, S.M., & Restifo, K. (2013). A Practitioner’s Guide to Mindful Parenting. New York: Springer, or Norton & Company.

Professor Dr. Susan Bögels is a clinical psychologist and psychotherapist, specialized in Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for children and their families, and mindfulness trainer. She works as professor in developmental psychopatholoy at the University of Amsterdam and is the director of the academic treatment clinic for parents and children UvA minds and co-director of the academic training center UvA minds You in Amsterdam. Her main research theme is the intergenerational transmission of psychopathology. Mindfulness for parents and children is another area of research and clinical interest.

 

Pre-congress Workshop #7

Professor Lars-Göran Öst

Affiliation: Stockholm University, Sweden; Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden

Title: One-session treatment of specific phobias

 

Abstract:
Scientific background

Specific phobia is the most prevalent of all psychiatric disorders in the general population with a lifetime prevalence of 12.5%. However, few people suffering from specific phobia apply for treatment, mainly because they are not aware of the treatment possibilities, or they are afraid that the treatment itself will be worse than having the phobia. I have developed a rapid treatment that is carried out in one single session, which is maximized to 3 hours. The treatment is based on a cognitive behavior analysis of the catastrophic beliefs the patient has in relation to a possible confrontation with the phobic object or situation. Exposure in-vivo is done as a series of behavioral experiments to help the patient test the catastrophic beliefs they have. In animal phobics participant modelling is used as an adjunct. During the last two decades I have done 11 randomized clinical studies of one-session treatment (OST) in phobias of spiders, snakes, blood-injury, injections, dental care, flying and enclosed places in adults and 2 studies on various specific phobias in children and adolescents. The mean treatment time varies between 2 and 3 hours and the proportion of clinically significant improvement between 78-93%. The effects are maintained, or furthered, at the 1-year follow-up. These results have been replicated in at least 28 RCTs carried out in USA (8), Germany (4), Holland (4), Australia (3), Austria (2), England (2), Norway (2), Belgium (1), Canada (1), and Spain (1).

 

Key learning objectives

During the workshop the participants will learn to assess specific phobias and get knowledge regarding how these can be treated in a one-session format using exposure and modelling.

 

Training modalities

Video and live demonstrations

 

Key references

Davis III, T., Ollendick, T. & Öst, L-G. (Eds.) (2012). Intensive one-session treatment of specific phobias. New York: Springer.

Öst, L-G. (1989). One-session treatment for specific phobias. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 27, 1-7.

Öst, L-G. (1997). Rapid treatment of specific phobias. In G. Davey (Ed.) Phobias: A handbook of description,treatment and theory. London: Wiley (pp. 229-246).

Öst, L-G., Alm, T., Brandberg, M. & Breitholtz, E. (2001). One vs. five sessions of exposure and five sessions of cognitive therapy in the treatment of claustrophobia. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 39, 167-183.

Öst, L-G., Svensson, L., Hellström, K., & Lindwall, R. (2001). One-session treatment of specific phobias in youth: A randomized clinical trial. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 69, 814-824.

Ollendick, T.H., Öst, L-G., Reuterskiöld, L., Costa, N., Cederlund, R., Sirbu, C., Davis III, T.E. & Jarrett, M.A. (2009). One-session treatment of specific phobias in youth: A randomized clinical trial in the USA and Sweden. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 77, 504-516.

 

Brief description of workshop leader(s)

Lars-Göran Öst, Professor emeritus of clinical psychology, Dept of Psychology, Stockholm University is the developer of one-session treatment for specific phobias. He has been doing research in CBT for 45 years and has two more treatments on the list of evidence-based treatments (applied relaxation for GAD and applied tension for blood phobia). He was also one of the founding “fathers” of the European Association of Behaviour Therapy in 1971.

 

Implications for everyday clinical practice of CBT

The workshop will show that all types of specific phobias can be effectively treated in one-session maximized to three hours. Research shows that 80-90% of the patients are remitted after a single session. In clinical situations therapists have an advantage; they can have the cake and eat it, i.e. if the goal is not reached within the 3 hour session one can just add another session next week and this is usually enough. By learning how to do OST therapist will have an effective treatment for the most prevalent anxiety disorder in the adult population.

 

Pre-congress Workshop #8

Professor JoAnne Dahl

Affiliation: Uppsala University, Sweden

Co-leader: Magnus Johansson, Uppsala University, Sweden

Title:  Workshop on the prevention of prejudice: Using Perspective taking to develop empathy and psychological flexibility

 

Abstract:
Background

Racism is now a present in our everyday lives here in Sweden and in the world. Political parties now openly encourage violence towards immigrants, and towards people of other cultures and religions such as Islam. There is significant evidence that health care providers hold stereotypes based on race, class sex and other characteristics that, in fact, influence interpretations of behaviours, symptoms as well as clinical decisions and treatment. Health care workers are often unaware of these stereotypes or stigma which they carry. There is also evidence to show that heath care providers interact less effectively with clients from minority groups than with those from similar class, culture and race. So far, most programs for dealing with this problem have been to focus on improving health care providers with cross-cultural communication skills which have had only limited effects on these mostly unaware stigma that result in stereotyped conceptualisation and resulting action. Prejudice is shown to have significant consequence for those who are targeted in areas of education, physical and mental health care, housing, employment and even financial institutions. (e.g., Pager & Shepherd, 2008; Pascoe & Richman, 2009; Puhl & Heuer, 2009) .

If we seriously want to reduce this trend towards greater racism, we need to understand and disseminate the psychological components driving this destructive behaviour. Based on that understanding we need to develop interventions that can help to encourage human connection over race, gender, culture and religion. The opposite of racism is empathy. The aim of the present workshop is to present an intervention program recently developed for use in a clinical psychology program in Sweden that can be used both in a face to face or internet program to reduce racism and increase empathy and human connection over race, gender, culture and religion.

 

Objectives

Participants will learn

  • how to conceptualize racism, stigma and prejudice from Relational Frame Theory
  • an understanding of how perpective-takning helps to develop empathy
  • to practice perspective taking skills used in empathy training for used in helping your self with you own reactions when helping clients.
  • to practice perspective taking skills used in empathy training for helping clients with their stigma, prejudice and discrimination.

 

Pre-congress Workshop #9

Professor David M Clark

Affiliation: University of Oxford, United Kingdom

Title: An Update on Cognitive Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder in Adults and Adolescents

 

Abstract

Social anxiety disorder is common and remarkably persistent in the absence of treatment. It frequently leads to occupational and educational underachievement. Interpersonal relationships are impaired. Dissatisfaction with the way that life is progressing often triggers depressive episodes.

 

Clark and Wells (1995) proposed a cognitive model that aims to explain why social anxiety disorder is so persistent. A distinctive form of cognitive therapy that targets the maintenance processes classified in the model was developed. Randomised controlled trials in the UK, Germany and Sweden have demonstrated that the new treatment is highly effective. Comparisons with other active treatments have established that cognitive therapy is superior to: two forms of group CBT, exposure therapy, interpersonal psychotherapy, psychodynamic psychotherapy, SSRIs, medication-focussed treatment as usual, and placebo medication. Such a comprehensive demonstration of differential effectiveness is extremely rare in psychotherapy.

 

Recently, David Clark & Eleanor Leigh have also explored the value of CT_SAD as a treatment in adolescents, as well as adults. Preliminary results are very encouraging. This workshop provides a practical guide to cognitive therapy with adults and adolescents. It starts with an overview of the cognitive model, focussing on its treatment implications. Each of the steps in treatment is then described and illustrated with case material and videos of treatment sessions. The key procedures include: deriving with patients an individualized cognitive model; demonstrating the adverse effects of self-focused attention and safety behaviours through experiential exercises; video feedback and other procedures to correct excessively negative self-imagery, training in externally focused, non-evaluative attention; behavioural experiments to test negative beliefs; and ways of dealing with socially relevant traumatic memories (discrimination training & memory re-scripting). Guidance on the use of the most appropriate measures for identifying therapy targets and monitoring progress is also provided. The workshop explains why some procedures that are common in other CBT programmess (e.g. thought-records, positive self-talk in a phobic situation, exposure hierarchies) are NOT used in Clark & Wells’ cognitive therapy programme.

 

You will learn

1.      To identifying key processes in maintaining social anxiety disorder

2.      The main procedures in cognitive therapy for social anxiety disorder

3.      How to track change in the maintainence processes during therapy.

 

Recommended Reading

Clark, D.M. & Wells, A. (1995). A cognitive model of social phobia. In RG Heimberg, M. Liebowitz, D.Hope & F.Scheier (Eds) Social Phobia: Diagnosis, Assessment and Treatment. Pp 69-93. Guilford: New York.

 

Or

Clark, D.M. (2001) A cognitive perspective on social phobia. In R. Crozier   and L.E. Alden (eds) International Handbook of Social Anxiety Wiley; Chichester, UK

Clark, D.M., Ehlers, A., Hackmann, A., McManus, F., Fennell, M.J.V., Waddington, L., Grey, N, and Wild, J. (2006). Cognitive therapy and exposure plus applied relaxation in social phobia: a randomized controlled trial. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 74, 568-578.

Stangier, U., Schramm, E., Heidenreich, T., Berger, M., & Clark, D. M. (2011). Cognitive therapy vs interpersonal psychotherapy in social anxiety disorder: a randomized controlled trial. Archives of General Psychiatry, 68(7), 692-700. doi: 10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2011.67

 

Pre-congress Workshop #10

Professor Emily A. Holmes

Professor in Clinical Psychology and Wellcome Trust Clinical Fellow

Affiliation: MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge, United Kingdom
Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden

Title: MENTAL IMAGERY: Cognitive Science and Cognitive Therapy

 

Abstract

From a cognitive science perspective mental imagery involves an experience like perception in the absence of a percept: seeing in our mind’s eye, hearing with our mind’s ear and so forth.  Imagery has extremely interesting properties – it recruits similar brain areas to actual perception, and enhances memory and learning.  Our experimental work has shown that compared to verbal processing, mental imagery has a more powerful impact on emotion.

From a clinical practice perspective, intrusive, affect-laden images cause distress across psychological disorders.  Imagery-based  intrusive memories and “flashbacks” to a past trauma are the hallmark of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Intrusive mental imagery can also occur of the future, such as “flashforwards” to suicidal acts or manic pursuits in bipolar disorder. We need to know how to work with dysfunctional imagery, and promote adaptive imagery using imagery-focussed cognitive psychotherapy techniques.

This workshop will discuss the science and practice of imagery based cognitive therapy and we will draw on the techniques outlined in Hackmann A., Bennett-Levy, J. & Holmes, E. A. (2011). Oxford Guide to Imagery in Cognitive Therapy. Oxford: Oxford University Press, including how to assess and ‘microformulation’ imagery in psychological disorders.  In addition we will discuss new techiques developed in reference to our team’s work in trauma, depression, and bipolar disorder, such as imagery re-scripting and metacognitive approaches. The workshop will use training techniques such as group experiences and illustrative examples using video.

For further information see our group’s webpage at: http://www.mrc-cbu.cam.ac.uk/our-research/holmes/

 

Key references

• Hackmann A., Bennett-Levy, J. & Holmes, E. A. (2011). Oxford Guide to Imagery in Cognitive Therapy. Oxford: Oxford University Press

• Holmes, E. A., & Mathews, A. (2010). Mental imagery in emotion and emotional disorders. Clinical Psychology Review, 30(3), 349-362.

• Pearson, J., Naselaris, T., Holmes, E. A., & Kosslyn, S. M. (2015). Mental imagery: functional mechanisms and clinical applications. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 19(10), 590-602

Professor Emily Holmes, PhD, DClinPsych is a clinical psychologist and researcher. She completed her clinical psychology doctorate at Royal Holloway University of London, and a PhD in Cognitive Neuroscience in Cambridge. She is programme Leader of the Emotional Disorders and Mental Imagery group at the Medical Research Council Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit (MRC-CBU), Cambridge.She is also a consultant clinical psychologist with an NHS honorary contract, a Guest Professor at Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, and a Visiting Professor of Clinical Psychology at the University of Oxford. Personal home page (including publications): https://www.mrc-cbu.cam.ac.uk/people/emily.holmes/

 

Pre-congress Workshop #11

Professor Patricia van Oppen

Affiliation: GGZinGeest, The Netherlands

Workshop Co-Leader: Jenneke Wiersma, GGZinGeest; Eva-Lotta Brakemeier; Jan Philipp Klein

Title: Cognitive Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy (CBASP) for the treatment of chronic depression.

 

Abstract:
Background

Treating patients with chronic depression can be challenging for the clinician. These patients often have difficulties establishing an open, trusting, and constructive relationship. Patients might appear withdrawn, anxious, suspicious, or even openly hostile. Their behavior can be understood, however, against the background of the pervasive maltreatment these patients often have endured with significant others. Still, their behavior is an obstacle for establishing a good therapeutic relationship and therefore the success of treatment. In this workshop we will present a psychotherapy model developed specifically to treat these patients called ‘Cognitive Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy (CBASP)’ developed by James McCullough Jr.

 

Objectives

In CBASP, personal involvement techniques are a central element of successful therapy. These techniques offer a new way of conceptualizing the therapist-patient relationship in the terminology of cognitive-behavioral therapy. With another interpersonal skills training technique called situational analysis, patients learn to recognize the conse-quences of their behavior and how to behave in a goal-directed manner in interpersonal situations.

 

Training modalities

In the workshop we will briefly describe the theoretical foundation of CBASP and then introduce the techniques of CBASP using video and live demonstrations as well as exercises for the workshop participants. In the end, participants will have learned new strategies for the establishment of a constructive therapeutic relationship with their (often interpersonally traumatized) chronic depressive patients.

 

References

McCullough, J. P., Schramm, E., Penberthy, J. K. (2015). CBASP as a distinctive treatment for persistent depressive disorder. Londen: Routledge

 

Pre-congress Workshop #12

Christof Loose

Affiliation: Heinrich-Heine-University Duesseldorf, Germany

Co-leader: Maria Galimzyanova, St Petersburg State University, Russia

Title: Schematherapy for Children, Adolescents, and Parents

Abstract:
Background

Schema Therapy (ST) developed by Jeffrey Young is an enhancement and development of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), and particularly integrates emotions, but also developmental aspects centrally in their diagnostic and therapeutic considerations. In addition, ST is based on a model of schemas, modes and the basic needs and “their fate” during the life course. Therefore, ST – in terms of technical and strategic variant of CBT – seems to be also and especially in the field of child and adolescent therapy particularly suited to generate action-guiding, diagnostic and therapeutic concepts.

In this Pre-Congress Workshop, first the schema therapeutic conceptual model (schemas, modes, coping strategies), the underlying theory (central importance of core needs in the context of developmental tasks), and requirements in the therapeutic attitude (eg, concept of “limited reparenting” and “empathic confrontation”) are briefly outlined. Related to the children’s age some of the 18 schemas described by Young are outlined with their typical child and adolescent cognitions, coping strategies, and parental characteristics. In the center of the workshop are training and practice units, encompassing schema therapeutic strategies that have proven successful in schema- and modedriven, cognitive behavioral therapy of childhood and adolescence. In a glance schema therapeutic strategies with younger patients are demonstrated: Working with drawings, board-games, using storytelling and fairy tale therapy techniques, working with finger puppets, marionettes, sand-play, metaphors, chair work, and the use of flash cards. Another focus is laid on the work with parents in terms of “Schema Coaching” that include schema or mode specific transactional processes between child and parent and shed a light on mutual reinforcement’s processes of child’s und parent’s maladaptive schemas and dysfunctional modes. Also during the workshop Group ST- CA will be discussed. First of all, goals and stages of Group ST CA will be outlined. Ways of identifying the modes in group therapy will be presented (matrioshka model, discussing cartoons and behavior of the characters).
Different techniques of mode-driven group work are going to be demonstrated. It will be discussed how a group CA schema therapist can address to different modes of a child to be able to help them to strengthen their healthy modes, weaken and disempower dysfunctional modes (using imagery, art- therapy, cinema and cartoontherapy, music therapy, fairytale therapy, CBT techniques, mode role-play). Basic tools of a group schema therapist are to be discussed.

Objectives

Workshop’s participants have understood and learned the following contents:
– Meaning/Importance of basic needs, early maladaptive schemas, modes and coping strategies
– Psychoeducation through drawings and finger puppets
– Limited re-parenting with child modes, especially with the vulnerable and angry child modes;
– Chair dialogue, audio flashcard,
– Empathic confronting the detached protector mode,
– Schema Therapy for caregivers/parents (Schema Coaching, Systemic Schema Therapy)
– Group ST with children and adolescents.
– Goals and stages of Group ST CA.
– Mode diagnostics in Group ST-CA
– Techniques of mode-driven group work (imagery, art- therapy, cinema and cartoon therapy, music therapy, fairytale therapy, CBT techniques, mode role-play).

Training modalities

Training modalities are didactic (conceptual model), and experiential (techniques) including practice units like role play.

 

References

Galimzyanova M.V., Kasyanik P.M. ,Romanova E.V., The effectiveness of a schema focused approach in managing work stress// Materials of 10th Conference of European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology 11-13 April 2014 ETH London, Great Britain – International House, Jubilee campus, Wollaton Rd, Nottingham, 2014- p.205-206

Loose, Graaf & Zarbock (2013). Schematherapie mit Kindern und Jugendlichen. Weinheim: Beltz

Loose, Graaf & Zarbock (2013). Störungsspezifische Schematherapie mit Kindern und Jugendlichen. Weinheim: Beltz

Leaders: 

Bio: Christof Loose, PhD., works at the Institute of Experimental Psychology, Department of Clinical Psychology, and in his own Private Practice in Dusseldorf, Germany. He is certified in ST-CA, the chair of the Working Group ST-CA (ISST e.V.), editor and author of ST-CA books and Video-Learning (DVD) in Germany.

Bio: Maria Galimzyanova is an associate professor of St-Petersburg State University,( department of psychology of development and differential psychology), she is a member of St-Petersburg Institute of Schema-Therapy and works with children, adolescents, parents and adults in a psychological center “Anima” in St Petersburg. Maria is certified as a trainer and supervisor in Individual ST, group ST and Child-and Adolescent ST.

 

Pre-congress Workshop #13

Professor Edward Watkins

Affiliation: University of Exeter, United Kingdom

Title: Rumination-focused CBT as a transdiagnostic treatment for depression and anxiety

Abstract:
Background

Rumination has been identified as a core process in the maintenance and onset of depression (Nolen-Hoeksema, 1991; 2000) and as a possible mechanism contributing to co-morbidity (Harvey et al., 2004). Furthermore, rumination seems to be a difficultto- treat symptom, which is associated with poorer outcomes for psychological therapy. This workshop will illustrate how the CBT approach can be modified to reduce rumination in chronic, recurrent and residual depression, using new approaches derived from clinical experience and experimental research. A programme of research by Dr Watkins has suggested that the thinking style adopted during rumination can determine whether it has helpful or unhelpful consequences on social problem solving (Watkins & Moulds, 2005) and emotional processing (Watkins, 2004; Watkins et al, 2008). There is also strong reasons to consider rumination as an mental habit (Watkins & Nolen-Hoeksema, 2014). This experimental work has inspired a novel approach to treating depression, called Rumination-focused CBT, which focuses on changing the process of thinking, rather than simply changing the content of thinking, in order to be more effective in successfully reducing rumination and treating depression (Watkins, 2016). There is now empirical backing for the efficacy of this approach for difficult-to-treat patients in terms of a positive open case series (Watkins et al., 2007) and a randomised controlled trial funded by NARSAD (Watkins et al.,
2011; Watkins, 2015), as well as in the prevention of depression and anxiety (Topper et al, submitted) with a recent trial showing that group RFCBT outperformed standard group CBT for treating severe major depression (Hvennegard et al, submitted). The workshop will review the theoretical background and core techniques of the therapy, including functional analysis of thinking style, behavioural activation, use of imagery, experiential exercises and behavioural experiments to coach patients to shift to more adaptive styles of thinking. This workshop has been successfully received at a number of BABCP and EABCT events.

Objectives

– To review the theory and research relevant to depressive rumination
– To review the rumination-focused CBT approach, including behavioural activation, functional analysis, modifying thought-form-process, training in shifting thinking style, experiential exercises that counter rumination including relaxation, mental absorption and compassion
– To illustrate treatment approaches to depressive rumination via video and experiential approaches
– Workshop attendees will be able to describe the nature and consequences of rumination in depression.
– Workshop participants will have insight into CBT approaches for rumination in depression.
– Workshop participants will practise novel process-focused techniques for changing patient’s relationship to their ruminative thoughts.

Training modalities

didactic, experiential, role play, observation of video

 

References

Watkins, E.R. (2015). Psychological Treatment of Depressive Rumination. Current Opinion in Psychology, 4:32-36.
Watkins, E.R. & Nolen-Hoeksema, S. (2014). A habit-goal framework of depressive rumination. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 123, 24-34. DOI: 10.1037/a0035540
Watkins, E.R., Mullan, E.G., Wingrove, J., Rimes, K., Steiner, H., Bathurst, N., Eastman, E., & Scott, J. (2011). Rumination-focused cognitive behaviour therapy for residual depression: phase II randomized controlled trial. British Journal of Psychiatry, 199, 317- 322. Doi:10.1192/bjp.bp.110.090282
Watkins, E.R. (2016). Rumination-focused cognitive behavioral therapy for depression. New York: Guilford Press.

Leaders: 

Professor Watkins is Professor of Experimental and Applied Clinical Psychology at the School of Psychology, University of Exeter and co-founder of the Mood Disorders Centre, University of Exeter, and Director of the Study of Maladaptive to Adaptive Repetitive Thought (SMART) Lab. He trained at the Institute of Psychiatry, London, completed his PhD with Prof John Teasdale as his supervisor, and then held a joint research position between the Institute of Psychiatry and the Medical Research Council – Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit. He has specialist clinical training and expertise in cognitive therapy for depression. He currently works as a researcher, teacher, and clinical practitioner. He co-founded the Mood Disorders Centre, a partnership between the University of Exeter and Devon Partnership NHS Trust, specialising in psychological research and treatment for depression. His research has been funded by the Wellcome Trust, UK Medical Research Council (MRC) Experimental Medicine Award and a NARSAD Young Investigators Award. A £3.6 million Wellcome Trust Capital award has funded the building of a new fit-for-purpose clinical research centre at Exeter. Professor Watkins was awarded the British Psychological Society’s May Davidson Award 2004 for outstanding early-career contributions to the development of clinical psychology. He is a current member of the UK NICE Guidelines Committee for Adult Depression.

 

IN-CONGRESS WORKSHOPS
SEPTEMBER 1-3

Please note that you can only register for a maximum of one of the free in-congress workshops as we want many to be able to take part. You can add as many registrations as you like for workshops that have an additional cost.

Thursday September 1, 8:30 – 12:00

Additional cost

Tara O’Donoghue
Workshop Co-Leader: Lisa Williams. Anxiety Disorder Residential Unit, London, UK

Affiliation: University of Dundee, Dundee, United Kingdom

Title: Building Shame Resilience in OCD and BDD populations

 

Abstract

Workshop Leaders: Tara O’Donoghue is a senior CBT and CFT psychotherapist specialising in assessment and treatment of OCD at the national specialist unit for OCD alongside Dr David Veale; The Anxiety Disorders Residential Unit, The Royal Bethlem, South London and Maudsley. The unit was recently part of the channel 4 series ‘Bedlam’. She has published an article with Dr David Veale focusing on behavioural change (featured in Behavioural & Cognitive Psychotherapy) and has presented about OCD at previous workshops.

Lisa Williams is a senior CBT and CFT psychotherapist who has worked in Mental Health for over 15 years. Lisa currently specialises in the assessment and treatment of OCD at the national specialist unit for OCD alongside Dr David Veale; The Anxiety Disorders Residential Unit, The Royal Bethlem, South London and Maudsley. She is also a honorary lecturer on the CBT Post Graduate Diploma Course at Canterbury Christchurch University and has taught CBT and CFT both nationally and internationally.

Background: Shame is a self-conscious and deeply painful emotion. It is often experienced as a wholly negative judgement leading us to feel worthless, small and often exposed ( Tangey and Dearing, 2002) . Shame is instrumental in causing many individuals to avoid rather than approach the meaningful life that many so wish to lead.

Shame often leads to poor access of treatment and often causes barriers within treatment due to difficulty in disclosing memories or cognitions related to shame experiences.. When compared to guilt and embarrassment, shame appears to be more painful, more consistently correlated with psychopathology and more predictive of damaging outcomes.

Research has highlighted that shame and self-criticism are trans diagnostic (e.g. higher levels are found in people with depression, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, personality disorders and PTSD) and can accentuate and maintain these disorders.

High levels of shame and self-criticism have also been found to limit the effectiveness of standard therapy. One reason for such difficulties is that people may not have developed abilities to experience certain affiliative positive emotions such as safeness, reassurance and compassion. These individuals often come from abusive/bullying, neglectful and/or critical backgrounds.

Alongside more traditional CBT approaches to working with shame, participants will learn about the model underpinning CFT, rooted in evolutionary understanding of the development of mind, neuroscience, neurophysiological and attachment research helping to understanding the nature of our three basic emotions regulation systems, and our understanding the development and function of shame and self-criticism.

We will also explore how by developing a ‘compassionate mind’, using imagery , breathing techniques, compassionate flexibility , mirror work and building strength and courage we can help people to work with their shame and self-criticism and build their shame resilience.

This workshop will aim to introduce participants to shame and its role in OCD and BDD. We will explore – from an evolutionary, attachment, neurophysiological and neuroscience perspective – an understanding of what may lead us to struggle with shame and self-criticism, and how the cultivation of affiliative feelings, along with the development of compassion, may facilitate and promote well-being. We will consider how shame and self-criticism can block affiliative feelings and explore how therapists may help their clients to develop a greater capacity to experience compassion (in particular, self-compassion) to reduce distress and suffering and how this can be best integrated into Cognitive Behavioural Therapy.

 

Teaching Methods: Experiential

Case Discussion
Role Play
Video
Didactic

 

Workshop Objectives:

A – Recognising shame in OCD and BDD populations
B – Participants will learn about the model underpinning CFT, rooted in evolutionary understanding of the development of mind, neuroscience, neurophysiological and attachment research helping to understanding the nature of our three basic emotions regulation systems, and our understanding the development and function of shame and self-criticism.

-Participants will learn skills and techniques to help build shame resilience
-Participants will feel more confident in their ability to integrate compassion approaches into Cognitive Behavioural Therapy ( CBT) for OCD and BDD.

 

References:

Weingarden. H and Renshaw. K.D (2015). Shame in the obsessive compulsive related disorders: A conceptual review. Journal of Affective Disorders 171. 74-84
Veale. D. and Gilbert. P.(2014). Body Dysmorphic disorder: The functional and evolutionary context in phenomenology and compassionate mind. Journal of Obsessive and related Disorders 3 (2014) 150-160

 

.full-width-5a2f8dc0330bf { min-height:100px; padding:10px 0 10px; margin-bottom:10px; } #background-layer--5a2f8dc0330bf { background-position:left top; background-repeat:repeat; ; }
Professor Per Carlbring1 Professor Gerhard Andersson2

Affiliation: 1Stockholm University, Sweden, 2Linköping University, Sweden; Karolinska Institutet, Sweden

Title: Internet treatment for anxiety disorders

 

Abstract:
Scientific background

Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT) has a relatively short history, with the first trials being conducted in the late 1990s. Since then well above 120 randomized controlled trials suggest that ICBT can be effective. Effect sizes for ICBT have been well within the range of face-to-face CBT with the exception of unguided programs (e.g., not even minimal therapist contact), which usually, but not always, result in smaller effects.

So, the evidence is there but how is it done? In this workshop two pioneers in the field will present some recent research findings, but primarily share their experiences of how to become a true expert internet therapist. It is clear that therapist guidance generally is important for good outcome – but how much, how often and when should you do it? And most importantly, what should you write in your feedback? Based on their own research from analyzing the written content of email messages, sent from both the client and the therapist, clear suggestions will be shared and also practiced during the workshop.

In the workshop clinical case examples will be provided together with screenshots and demonstration of treatment systems including the Swedish web platform as well as a gamified virtual reality exposure therapy intervention. Furthermore, a recently tested smartphone application will also be briefly presented.

Finally, you will learn about the risk of negative effects of Internet-based cognitive behavior therapy and how to measure the occurrence of symptom deterioration, adverse and unwanted events, and their relationship with long term treatment outcome.

 

Key learning objectives
  • Understanding the varieties of Internet treatments and their differential effects
  • Getting to know what is needed to set up a service using the Internet (the basics)
  • Learning what is required to obtain good outcomes with guided Internet treatment
  • Knowing what is required in terms of therapist training and skills.
  • Learning about the pros and cons of Internet treatment including tailoring treatment according to patient symptom profile.
Training modalities

Lecture, role play, group discussions.

2-3 key references

Andersson, G. (2014). The internet and CBT: A clinical guide. Boca Raton: CRC Press.

Andersson, G., Cuijpers, P., Carlbring, P., Riper, H., & Hedman, E. (2014). Internet-based vs. face-to-face cognitive behaviour therapy for psychiatric and somatic disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis. World Psychiatry, 13, 288-295. Doi: 10.1002/wps.20151

 

Brief description of workshop leader(s)

Both professor Per Carlbring and professor Gerhard Andersson are licensed psychologists, licensed psychotherapists and board certified specialists in clinical psychology. They have been active researchers in the internet interventions field since the late 1990s. For more information detailed see their respective web sites: www.carlbring.se and www.gerhardandersson.se

 

Implications for everyday clinical practice of CBT

After this workshop you will know more about how these alternative methods of CBT support can be integrated within a busy practice and supporting people in innovative ways.

 

 

Free

Shiva Thorsell

Affiliation: Altrecht Psychosomatiek Eikenboom, The Netherlands
Co-leader: Jaap Spaans, Altrecht Psychosomatiek Eikenboom, The Netherlands

Title: Perspective taking skills in the treatment of severe somatoform disorders

 

Abstract:

In acceptance based therapy of severe somatoform disorders, perspective taking techniques are essential to the process of mindfulness. Being mindful entails a sense of the perspective from which one observes: ‘I’m here now and the pain is in the left part of my back’.

Perspective taking is the fundamental cognitive capacity to consider the world from another (individual’s) viewpoint” (Galinsky et al., 2008). Patients can learn to take different perspectives like ‘how would my friend react to a pain like this?’ or ‘How will I remember my present fatigue next week?’ In this way they learn that their bodily sensations are private experiences which can be observed, tolerated and approached with an open mind. According to the relational frame theory, the relational frames of “I-YOU”, “HERE-THERE”, “NOW”-THEN are central to the development of perspective taking (Barnes-Holmes et al., 2004).

Together with developing the ability of perspective taking, patients enhance a sense of being observers of their own body related sensations, thoughts or emotions (Mw Hughes et al., 2012).

Both perspective taking and the sense of being observer reduce the stimulus control exerted by the content of body related private experiences such as the thought ‘I can’t stand this any longer’ which eventually leads to avoidance.

Techniques of perspective taking can easily be combined with various therapies for severe somatoform disorders like cognitive behavioral therapy and acceptance and mindfulness based therapies.

 

Key Learning Objectives

Gaining knowledge and skills in perspective taking techniques in an acceptance and mindfulness based treatment for severe somatoform disorders .

 

Training modalities:

Presentations, demonstrations and exercises.

 

References

Barnes-Holmes, Y., McHugh, L. and Barnes-Holmes, D. (2004) Perspective-Taking and Theory of Mind: A Relational Frame Account. The Behavior Analyst Today,5,15-25.

Galinsky, A., Maddux, W., Gilin, Debra, and White, J. (2008) Why it pays to get inside the head of your opponent: The differential effects of perspective taking and empathy in negotiations. Association for Psychological Science. Vol 19, 4, 378-384.

McHugh, L., Stewart, I. & Hooper, N. (2012). A contemporary functional analytic account of perspective taking. In McHugh & Stewart (Ed.). The Self and Perspective Taking; Contributions from Contemporary Behavioral Science (55-72).Oakland: New Harbinger Publications.

 

Workshop leaders

S.Thorsell (Shiva) is clinical psychologist (MSc), Head of the in-patient ward at Albrecht Psychosomatiek Eikenboom, Zeist, Dutch expertise centre for psychosomatic medicine. She is specialized in acceptance and commitment therapy and (self)compassion training.

J.A. Spaans (Jaap) is a senior clinical psychologist (MSc),CBT supervisor, Head of the daytreatment-service at Altrecht Psychosomatiek Eikenboom, Zeist, Dutch expertise centre for psychosomatic medicine. He is the author of several (ACT) self-help books and the chairman of the Dutch network of institutions for medically unexplained symptoms (NOLK).

 

 

Dr Hannah Murray

Affiliation: Springfield Hospital, United Kingdom
Co-leader: Sharif El-Leithy, Springfield Hospital, United Kingdom

Title: Beyond reliving in PTSD treatment: Advanced skills for overcoming common obstacles in memory work

 

 

Abstract
Backgorund

Good evidence exists for PTSD treatments in which memory-focused techniques such as imaginal reliving and prolonged exposure play a significant role. However, the evidence base is sparse for complex presentations of PTSD, for example where trauma has been experienced in early life, or is prolonged and severe. There are gaps in our understanding of how to adapt existing protocols to apply these treatments effectively with complex cases in routine clinical settings. Revisiting the principles and theories underlying treatment can help us generate novel, and adapt existing, techniques to overcome these difficulties. This workshop will bring together cognitive models of PTSD and memory, core CBT principles, and advanced therapeutic techniques to solve commonly encountered obstacles in PTSD treatment, such as overwhelming affect, difficulties connecting with feelings and memories, head-heart lag and problems identifying target memories in multiple trauma presentations.

 

Objectives
  • Identify common obstacles in working with trauma memories
  • Apply principles from existing cognitive models of PTSD to formulate these problems
  • Understand how diverse memory techniques can be conceptualised using these models
  • Learn practical ways to implement these techniques creatively while maintaining fidelity to cognitive models.

 

Training modalities

The workshop will complete Kolb’s learning cycle using case material to present clinical examples of commonly encountered problems in PTSD treatment, theoretical frameworks to conceptualise these problems, generate solutions using a broad range of memory and experiential techniques, and give opportunities for participants to practice and reflect on using these techniques in their own work.

Four key problem areas will be explored. For each area, a range of clinical examples will be presented, and generated from participants’ experiences. Fundamental principles will be applied to understand these difficulties; and how techniques from a range of models can be adapted to address the conceptual obstacles. Practical examples and tips on how to implement these techniques will be given, and participants will be invited to reflect on and role-play how they will apply similar strategies to their own cases.

 

References

Arntz, A. (2012). Imagery rescripting as a therapeutic technique: review of clinical trials, basic studies, and research agenda. Journal of Experimental Psychopathology, 3(2), 189-208.

Brewin, C. R., Gregory, J. D., Lipton, M., & Burgess, N. (2010). Intrusive images in psychological disorders: characteristics, neural mechanisms, and treatment implications. Psychological review, 117(1), 210.

Ehlers, A., & Clark, D. M. (2000). A cognitive model of posttraumatic stress disorder. Behaviour research and therapy, 38(4), 319-345.

 

Workshop Leaders

Drs Hannah Murray and Sharif El-Leithy are Clinical Psychologists based at the Traumatic Stress Service in South-West London. Between them they have 25 years of experience in working with complex cases of PTSD using trauma-focused CBT and supervise, teach and research widely in the field.

 

 

Dr Ingrid Söchting

Affiliation: University of British Columbia, Canada

Title: Group CBT for Depression in Adults

 

 

Abstract

A group format for depression can be just as effective as individual CBT for adults ((Hans & Hiller, 2013; Tucker & Oei, 2007). This workshop will summarize up to date research on CBT for depression including group CBT and outline a group treatment protocol. The 12-week session-by-session protocol includes psycho-education with emphasis on Aaron Beck’s cognitive model of depression, behavioral interventions, cognitive interventions, and relapse prevention in the form of continued-CBT (booster sessions) and/or mindfulness-based relapse prevention groups. Issues such as group preparation, dropout prevention, outcome measures, group process factors, and group leader qualifications will be addressed. In addition to presenting didactic information and individual cognitive restructuring techniques (e.g., Thought Records), theimportance of managing the group climate will also be addressed. A group format poses a unique challenge to CBT therapists and require them to work actively with the various group process factors such as group cohesion and trust in order to enhance individual outcomes.

Objectives

(1) To become familiar with eh research literature on group CBT for depression

(2) To appreciate the challenge in working with individual clients on cognitive restructuring yet capitalizing on the the entire group climate

(3) To develop a group CBT program for depression based on receiving a comprehensive set of handouts

Training Modalities

The workshop will be both didactic and experiential. The experiential component will include workshop participants volunteering to form a mock group with the workshop leader demonstrating how to implement interventions such as working with Thought Records in a group setting.

References

(1) Beck, A.T., & Haigh, A.P. (2014). Advances in Cognitive Theory and Therapy: The Generic Cognitive Model. Annual Review of Clinical Psychology, 10, 1-24.

(2) Padesky, C. & Greenberger, D. (1995) Clinician’s Guide to Mind Over Mood. The Guilford Press.

(3) Söchting, I. (2014). Cognitive and Behavioral Group Therapy: Challenges and Opportunities. Wiley-Blackwell.

Leaders

Ingrid Söchting is the Director of the UBC Psychology Clinic and a clinical associate professor in the Department of Psychiatry at UBC. She is the coordinator of the UBC Psychiatry Residency CBT Training. Over the past 20 years, she has specialized in treatment for mood and anxiety disorders including groups for depression, anxiety disorders, OCD, and trauma. Prior to leading the clinic at UBC, she was chief psychologist in an outpatient mental health clinic. She teaches Master’s level course in the clinical psychology program at UBC and supervises psychology and psychiatry residents in CBT). She is involved in psychotherapy research and has published over 25 peer-reviewed articles. She has given over 50 invited lectures and workshops in Canada and abroad. Most recently, she has published a guide on group CBT for clinicians: Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy: Challenges and Opportunities. Wiley Blackwell 2014. Dr. Söchting is a Canadian-Certified CBT therapist and a Certified Group Therapist of the American Group Psychotherapy Association. She is a Board member of the Canadian Institute for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and the Canadian Group Psychotherapy Foundation.

 

 

Dr Daniel Hamiel

Affiliation: Interdisciplinary Center Herzlia, Israel

Title: From Crisis to Growth- Resilience training with children and adults to prevent psychotpathology and build life skills

 

 

Abstract
Background

From Crisis to Growth- Resilience training with children and adults to prevent psychotpathology and build life skills. The objective of this workshop is to describe a preventive program to enhance resilience in the community. The progrm is deliverd by mediators in different community settings: in the education setting, in the primary care clinics and in instituations for the eldery. The interventions are based on a program originally implemented in schools to prepare children to cope with routine and traumatic stressors. During 2009-2014, the School Resilience Program trained thousands of teachers and counselors in Israel, to take responsibility to deliver resilience- and trauma-focused interventions. The program, endorsed by the Ministry of Education for a national pilot program in 18 local authorities, has been activated in 1200 schools and kindergartens (approx. 350,000 students). An advantage of the program is the ecological use of the class setting and the teachers as “clinical mediators”, and the dissemination of simple but effective clinically-informed methods to help children confront everyday stressors and process feelings and experiences. Techniques found effective in the therapeutic setting have been “translated” into educational didactics to be used easily by teachers and students. The program integrates emotional, physiological and cognitive behavioral techniques as well as methods to regulate the focus of attention (e.g., mindfulness) within a broader conceptualization of the concept of “control”. The students practice the techniques with daily stressors as a method of “immunization” for possible future severe challenges. This workshop, therefore, should be understood as part of a current innovative psycho-social approach to psychotherapy, directed to address masses of people who might need psychological assistance, based on principles of the 3rd wave of CBT and of Low Intensity CBT Interventions (LICBT-I). A series of empirical studies has shown the effectiveness of the program concerning the children’s functioning, the teachers self-efficacy and pedagogical performance, and the classroom atmosphere. For example, in children trained before or after traumatic exposure (e.g. missiles attacks, war, earthquake), the program was effective in reducing by 50% their symptoms of post-trauma, anxiety, fears, school and sleeping difficulties, compared with children who had not participate in the program. Based on this program we have developed and implemented resilience enhancement programs for different age groups (e.g., for parents and educational staff of infants in day-care centers, for adolescents at risk in boarding schools, for primary care patients by their physicians and for the elderly (delivered by volunteers) to cope with the challenges of this age. The workshop is designed for clinical psychologists, school counselors, educational psychologists, physicians, educators and teachers. We will review the theoretical background and emphasize the practicing of the various techniques and learn how to implement the program in different setting

Objectives

Main goals

1. To understand the theoretical background of the prevention and the School Resilience Program.

2. To learn how to implement the principles and techniques with individuals and groups in different settings.

3. To learn how to implement the program following daily life and traumatic stressors. Key Words: prevention, self-regulation, resilience, daily stressors, trauma, class setting, community, biofeedback (psycho-physiology), 3rd wave CBT, LICBT-I, cognitive techniques, mindfulness, elderly, primary care.

Training modalities

This workshop is an experiential one. The participants will learn the theoretical background of the intervention, they will practice the techniques and learn how to implement different modalities of the intervention in different age groups and populations.

References

L. Wolmer*, D. Hamiel*, N. Laor. (*equal contribution) Preventing children’s post traumatic stress after disaster with teacher-based intervention: A controlled study. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 2011, 50:340-348.

D. Hamiel, L. Wolmer, S. Spirman, N. Laor. Comprehensive child-oriented preventive resilience program in Israel based on lessons learned from communities exposed to war, terrorism and disaster. Child and Youth Care Forum,2013, 42:261-274

Wolmer, L., Hamiel, D., Versano-Eisman, T., Slone, M., Margalit, N., and Laor, N. Preschool Israeli Children Exposed to Rocket Attacks: Assessment, Risk and Resilience. Accepted for publication, Journal of Traumatic Stress.

Workshop Leader

Dr Hamiel is the head of the CBT Unit, Tel-Aviv Community Mental Health Center and the director of the educational intervention unit of the Cohen Harris Resilience Center. This center was chosen by the Israeli government to disseminate a model of Disaster Preparedness and Civic Resilience for mass disaster, and developing programs to prepare children to cope with trauma as well as with daily stressors. He is a senior lecturer at the psychology department at the Interdisciplinary Center Herzlia, a leading academic institute in Israel.

Dr Hamiel teaches CBT workshops worldwide. He is involved in developing and performing resilience programs in the community: In primary care clinics, with the elderly and in schools. He is a leading figure in developing the low intensity CBT interventions done by moderators, so evidence based simple psychological interventions become more available for the community.

 

.full-width-5a2f8dc03477b { min-height:100px; padding:10px 0 10px; margin-bottom:10px; } #background-layer--5a2f8dc03477b { background-position:left top; background-repeat:repeat; ; }

Thursday September 1, 10:30 – 12:00

Free Mini Workshop

Associate Professor Judith S Beck

Affiliation: Beck Institute for Cognitive Behavior Therapy, United States

Title: A Cognitive Behavioral Approach to Weight Loss and Maintenance

 

Abstract:
Scientific background

A number of studies have demonstrated the efficacy of CBT forweight loss and maintenance, when added to a nutritional and exercise program. See, for example, Stahre & Hallstrom (2005); Shaw (2005); Werrij et al (2009); Spahn et al (2010); Cooper et al (20110).

 

Key learning objectives:

Participants will be able to

1. Describe how the cognitive model applies to weight loss

2. List techniques to deal with hunger, craving and emotional eating

3. Use strategies to engage the reluctant or inconsistent dieter

 

Training modalities:

lecture from power point slides, roleplays, case discussion, question and answer

2-3 key references

Beck, J.S. (2005). The Beck Diet Solution. Birmingham, AL: Oxmoor House

Beck, J.S. and D. Busis (2015). The Diet Trap Solution. New York: Harper One.

Spahn, J. M., et al. (2010). State of the evidence regarding behavior change theories and strategies in nutrition counseling to facilitate health and food behavior change, American Dietetic Association.

 

Brief Description of Workshop Leader

Judith S. Beck, Ph.D., is the President of the Beck Institute for Cognitive Behavior Therapy, a non-profit organization in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, through which she has trained thousands of mental health professionals and students worldwide. She is also Clinical Associate Professor of Psychology in Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania. She is the author of the basic text in the field: Cognitive Behavior Therapy: Basics and Beyond, which has been translated into over 20 languages and Cognitive Therapy for Challenging Problems. She has written four books for consumers on the topic of a cognitive behavioral approach to weight loss and maintenance.

 

Implications for everyday clinical practice of CBT

The number of overweight and obese individuals has significantly increased throughout the world in recent decades. Pharmacological approaches and traditional behavioral approaches result in modest weight loss, but only in the short-run. About 30% of bariatric patients regain most or all of the weight that surgery has allowed them to use. A cognitive behavioral approach, emphasizing skills training and relapse prevention, may allow individuals to lose weight and keep in off in the long run.

 

Workshop description

Most dieters have difficulty either losing weight or sustaining weight loss. A significant reason for this is that they never learned the cognitive and behavioral skills they need to be successful. In this interactive workshop, we will discuss how to help dieters make fundamental changes in their thinking so they can maintain fundamental, and long lasting changes in their eating behavior. Skills include setting achievable goals; creating an accountability system; building self-efficacy; sticking to good eating habits; managing hunger, cravings, and the desire to eat for emotional reasons; solving diet-related problems,; staying on track and getting back on track immediately when they make a mistake; and continually motivating themselves through their lifetime.

Back to top

 

.full-width-5a2f8dc037418 { min-height:100px; padding:10px 0 10px; margin-bottom:10px; } #background-layer--5a2f8dc037418 { background-position:left top; background-repeat:repeat; ; }

Thursday September 1, 14:00 – 17:00

Professor Anke Ehlers

Affiliation: University of Oxford, United Kingdom

Title: Updating Trauma Memories with Cognitive Therapy for PTSD

 

Abstract:
Scientific background

Treatment guidelines recommend trauma-focused cognitive behavioural treatments as treatments of choice for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Cognitive Therapy for PTSD is a version of these treatments that builds on Ehlers and Clark’s (2000) cognitive model of PTSD. This model suggests that people with PTSD perceive a serious current threat that has two sources, excessively negative appraisals (personal meanings) of the trauma and / or its sequelae and characteristics of trauma memories that lead to reexperiencing symptoms. The problem is maintained by cognitive strategies (such as thought suppression, rumination, safety-seeking behaviours) that are intended to reduce the sense of current threat, but maintain the problem by preventing change in the appraisals and trauma memory, and / or lead to increases in symptoms.

Cognitive Therapy for PTSD has been shown to be highly effective and acceptable to patients (Duffy et al., 2007; Ehlers et al. 2003, 2005, 2014, 2016; Gillespie et al., 2002; Smith et al., 2007). It has three goals. First, the idiosyncratic personal meanings are identified and changed. Therapeutic techniques include identification of hot spots during the trauma and associated meanings, socratic questioning, and behavioural experiments. Second, the trauma memory is elaborated. Idiosyncratic personal meanings of the trauma are updated with information that corrects impressions and predictions at the time, using a range of techniques. In stimulus discrimination training, the patient learns to discriminate triggers of reexperiencing symptoms from the stimuli that were present during the trauma. Third, the patient experiments with dropping maintaining behaviours.

 

Key Learning Objectives

Participants will learn to

  • Identify important characteristics of trauma memories and their triggers,
  • Identify key processes that maintain PTSD,
  • Develop an idiosyncratic version of the treatment model with their patients,
  • Identify ways of changing problematic meanings in PTSD.
  • Identify ways of integrating changed meanings into trauma memories.

 

Training modalities

The workshop will give case examples to illustrate the different aspects of the model. Techniques used in the treatment are described and illustrated with clinical material and videotapes.

 

References

Ehlers, A., & Clark, D.M. (2000). A cognitive model of posttraumatic stress disorder. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 38, 319-345.

Ehlers, A., Hackmann, A., Grey, N, Wild, J., Liness, S., Albert, I., Deale, A., Stott, R., & Clark, D. M. (2014). A randomized controlled trial of 7-day intensive and standard weekly cognitive therapy for PTSD and emotion-focused supportive therapy. American Journal of Psychiatry, 171, 294-304.

Ehlers, A. & Wild, J. (2015). Cognitive Therapy for PTSD: Updating memories and meanings of trauma. In U. Schnyder and M. Cloitre (Eds.), Evidence based treatments for trauma-related psychological disorders (pp. 161-187). Cham, Switzerland: Springer.

 

Workshop Leader

Anke Ehlers is a Wellcome Trust Principal Research Fellow and Professor of Experimental Psychopathology at the Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, UK. She has received several awards for her work on posttraumatic stress disorder, including the Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions to Clinical Psychology, American Psychological Association and the Wilhelm Wundt- William James Award, awarded jointly by the European Federation of Psychology Associations and the American Psychological Foundation

 

Implications for Everyday Practice

Posttraumatic stress disorder is commonly seen in clinical practice. The workshop will equip participants with clinical tools to address the disabling reexperiencing symptoms that characterise this disorder.

 

.full-width-5a2f8dc03899b { min-height:100px; padding:10px 0 10px; margin-bottom:10px; } #background-layer--5a2f8dc03899b { background-position:left top; background-repeat:repeat; ; }
Lusia Stopa

Affiliation: University of Southampton, United Kingdom

Title: Imagery and the self: understanding how imagery maintains negative self-views and how you can use imagery to change them

 

Abstract:
Background:

Intrusive images are present in many disorders. They are often repetitive and uncontrollable, and act as emotional amplifiers in a number of models of psychopathology (Stopa, 2009). Holmes and Mathews (2010) argued that images trigger affective responses through direct influence on the brain’s emotional systems, through use of the same neural structures as perception, and through the activation of autobiographical memories. Negative self-images often derive from experiences such as neglect, abuse, bullying, and abandonment (Hinrichsen, Morrison,Waller, & Schmidt, 2007; Patel, Brewin, Wheatley, Wells, & Myers, 2007; Wells & Hackmann, 1993), and then help to maintain a vicious cycle of self-criticism, behavioral change (e.g.,avoidance, withdrawal), and disturbing physiological and emotional responses.

Traditional cognitive therapy techniques such as thought challenging can help people to re-evaluate their beliefs, but sometimes fail to impact on the emotional component of the beliefs. There is a growing body of evidence to suggest that imagery techniques, such as imagery rescripting are effective at helping people to re-evaluate and change negative views of self across a range of disorders (Stopa, 2011), This workshop will introduce a model of the relationship between imagery, autobiographical memory and the self based on Conway and Pleydell-Pearce’s (2000) self-memory system model and look at how imagery rescripting can be used to change negative self-representations. .

 

Objectives:

By the end of this workshop you should:

  1. Understand how imagery maintains negative self-views across a range of disorders
  2. Gain knowledge of the theory and practice of imagery rescripting.
  3. Know how to integrate imagery rescripting with more traditional cognitive therapy intervention techniques

 

Training modalities:

Didactic, modelling using videos of different imagery techniques, and role play.

 

References:

Arntz, A. (2011) Imagery rescripting for personality disorders. Cognitive and Behavioural Practice, 18, 466-481.

 

Stopa, L. (2009). Ed. Imagery and the Threatened Self: Perspectives on mental imagery and the self in cognitive therapy. London:Routledge.

 

Leaders:

Intrusive images are present in many disorders and often reflect memories of aversive experience such as abuse or bullying. Autobiographical memories provide a data bank of information about the self; about who we are and how we see ourselves. Understanding the link between memory and self-perception is important because distorted self-perceptions are at the heart of many disorders and negative self-images often encapsulate the individual’s negative beliefs. This workshop focuses on selfimagery and will look in detail at how distorted self-images develop and are maintained and at how to use imagery rescripting to change distorted views of self.

.full-width-5a2f8dc039e61 { min-height:100px; padding:10px 0 10px; margin-bottom:10px; } #background-layer--5a2f8dc039e61 { background-position:left top; background-repeat:repeat; ; }
Associate Professor Brjánn Ljótsson

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden

Title: Exposure based cognitive behavior therapy for irritable bowel syndrome – theory and treatment

 

Abstract

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder, which is characterized by abdominal pain combined with altered bowel habits and bloating. IBS is associated with impaired quality of life, increased health care use, and work loss. With a point prevalence of 11%, IBS is a common disorder within the healthcare system and although many mental healthcare practitioners know that IBS can be treated with psychological interventions, few have the necessary knowledge.

During this workshop, Dr. Ljótsson will present a cognitive behavioral treatment for IBS, based primarily on exposure and mindfulness exercises. The treatment focuses on changing dysfunctional behavioral patterns as excessive symptom control behaviors, avoidance, safety behaviors, and excessive toilet visits. The treatment is also influenced by acceptance and commitment therapy and emphasizes acceptance and mindfulness in response to symptom-related aversive experiences. Dr. Ljótsson will share both the theoretical underpinnings of the treatment as well as several practical examples how the treatment can be conduct with different patients. The treatment has been evaluated in several randomized controlled trials and shown efficacy both in terms of reduced symptoms and increased quality of life.

 

Professional background

Dr. Brjánn Ljótsson is researcher and associate professor in psychology at the Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychology, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden. He has worked for several years as clinical psychologist at a gastroenterology clinic specialized in managing and treating IBS and completed his PhD in 2011 on the topic. Dr Ljótsson is currently leading a project investigating the effects of CBT for IBS in children and adolescents and is involved in many other CBT research projects.

References

Ljótsson, B., Andersson, G., Andersson, E., Hedman, E., Lindfors, P., Andréewitch, S., et al. (2011a). Acceptability, effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness of internet-based exposure treatment for irritable bowel syndrome in a clinical sample: a randomized controlled trial. BMC Gastroenterology, 11(1), 110. http://doi.org/10.1186/1471-230X-11-110

Ljótsson, B., Andréewitch, S., Hedman, E., Rück, C., Andersson, G., & Lindefors, N. (2010a). Exposure and mindfulness based therapy for irritable bowel syndrome – an open pilot study. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 41(3), 185–190. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbtep.2010.01.001

Ljótsson, B., Falk, L., Vesterlund, A. W., Hedman, E., Lindfors, P., Rück, C., et al. (2010b). Internet-delivered exposure and mindfulness based therapy for irritable bowel syndrome – a randomized controlled trial. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 48(6), 531–539. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.brat.2010.03.003

Ljótsson, B., Hedman, E., Andersson, E., Hesser, H., Lindfors, P., Hursti, T., et al. (2011b). Internet-delivered exposure-based treatment vs. stress management for irritable bowel syndrome: a randomized trial. American Journal of Gastroenterology, 106(8), 1481–1491. http://doi.org/10.1038/ajg.2011.139

Ljótsson, B., Hedman, E., Lindfors, P., Hursti, T., Lindefors, N., Andersson, G., & Rück, C. (2011c). Long-term follow-up of internet-delivered exposure and mindfulness based treatment for irritable bowel syndrome. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 49(1), 58–61. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.brat.2010.10.006

Ljótsson, B., Hesser, H., Andersson, E., Lackner, J. M., Alaoui, El, S., Falk, L., et al. (2014). Provoking symptoms to relieve symptoms: A randomized controlled dismantling study of exposure therapy in irritable bowel syndrome. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 55C, 27–39. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.brat.2014.01.007

Ljótsson, B., Hesser, H., Andersson, E., Lindfors, P., Hursti, T., Rück, C., et al. (2013). Mechanisms of change in an exposure-based treatment for irritable bowel syndrome. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 81(6), 1113–1126. http://doi.org/10.1037/a0033439

 

Thursday September 1, 14:00 – 15:30

Free Mini Workshop

Dr. Stirling Moorey

Affiliation: South London and Maudsley NHS Trust, United Kingdom

Title: CBT for cancer and life limiting illness

 

Abstract:

This workshop will outline an approach to working with anxiety and depression in the setting of cancer and other life threatening physical illness. The basic principles of CBT still apply but being with people whose life expectancy may be limited can be daunting and deskilling. This mini workshop will give an overview of a treatment approach that has proven efficacy in cancer, and focus on how to work with patients’ and therapists’ negative thoughts about realistically adverse situations such as physical symptoms, disability and poor prognosis.

Learning Objectives

Participants will learn

1. general principles of using CBT in cancer.

2. how to apply CBT to hopelessness in the face of a realistic negative prognosis

3. working with our own negative cognitions.

This workshop is suitable for all CBT therapists who would like to feel more confident when faced with people with serious physical illness. A previous knowledge of CBT for anxiety and depression is helpful but not essential. Participants do not need to be currently working in liaison or physical illness settings.

Suggested reading

Moore S & Greer S, The Oxford Guide to CBT for People with Cancer (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012)

Back to top

 

.full-width-5a2f8dc03baf6 { min-height:100px; padding:10px 0 10px; margin-bottom:10px; } #background-layer--5a2f8dc03baf6 { background-position:left top; background-repeat:repeat; ; }

Friday September 2, 08:30 – 12:00

Additional cost

Riccardo Dalle Grave

Affiliation: Villa Garda Hospital, Italy

Title: Residential and day hospital CBT-E based treatment for eating disorders)

Abstract:
Background:

The mainstay of the treatment of eating disorders is outpatient treatment. Nevertheless, there are patients who need more intensive treatment. The aim of the workshop is to describes a novel model of residential and day-care treatment for eating disorders, one that it is entirely cognitive behavioural in orientation. The treatment was derived from the new “enhanced” form of outpatient cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT-E). Residential and day-care CBT-E retains three of the core characteristics of outpatient-based CBT-E: (1) it is designed to be suitable for all forms of clinical eating disorder; (2) the content of the treatment is dictated by the psychopathological features present and the processes that appear to be maintaining them; (3) the treatment addresses these processes using CBT-E strategies and procedures. However, it also has some features that distinguish it from the outpatientbased CBT-E: (1) it is delivered by multiple therapists from different professional backgrounds; (2) there is assistance with eating; (3) some elements of the treatment are delivered in a group format. In this workshop the treatment programme will be described in detail, together with data on its effectiveness, and the workshop will be illustrated with numerous clinical vignettes.

 

Objectives:

At the completion of this workshop:

  1. Participants will gain knowledge on how to adapt the CBT-E for the residential and day-care setting
  2. Participants will gain knowledge on how a multidisciplinary team can apply a single psychotherapeutic treatment
  3. Participants will gain knowledge on the use of a “manualized” treatment in a real world residential and day-care settings.

 

Training Modalities:

Didattic and interactive with clinical vignettes

 

References:

Dalle Grave R, Calugi S, El Ghoch M, Conti M, Fairburn CG (2014). Inpatient cognitive behavior therapy for adolescents with anorexia nervosa: immediate and longer-term effects. Frontiers in Psychiatry 5:14
Dalle Grave R, Calugi S, Conti M, Doll H, Fairburn CG (2013). Inpatient cognitive behaviour therapy for anorexia nervosa: A randomized controlled trial. Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics 82:390-398.
Dalle Grave R (2012). Intensive Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Eating Disorders. Nova, Hauppauge, NY

 

Leaders:

Dr. Riccardo Dalle Grave is the head of Department of Eating and Weight Disorders at Villa Garda Hospital Garda (Vr) Italy. The department includes 18 inpatients beds and 14 day-care beds for eating disorders patients, 20 beds for patients with severe obesity, and an outpatient service for eating disorder and obesity. In this department, he has developed an original inpatient treatment for eating disorder based entirely on the enhanced cognitive behavior therapy (CBT-E). Over the past 20 years, dr. Dalle Grave have published about 100 papers in international peer-reviewed journals, several books in Italian, and two book in U.S.

.full-width-5a2f8dc03cef0 { min-height:100px; padding:10px 0 10px; margin-bottom:10px; } #background-layer--5a2f8dc03cef0 { background-position:left top; background-repeat:repeat; ; }
Mike Kemani

Clinical psychologist, Ph.D

Behavior Medicine Pain Treatment Service, Karolinska Pain Center, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden

Affiliation: Behavior Medicine Pain Treatment Service, Karolinska Pain Center, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden

Title: Using Acceptance and Values in Pain Management – Integrating Core Clinical Strategies from Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in Clinical Practice

 

Abstract

Scientific background

Despite scientific advances within the medical field a substantial number of individuals continue to suffer from chronic pain, and for many of these persons pain also has debilitating effects on functioning in important areas of life. Studies indicate the efficacy of interventions based on cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), and during the past two decades, psychological interventions promoting acceptance of pain and related distress have also gained empirical support in both clinical and experimental studies (see e.g. Veehof et al., 2016). In Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), avoidance of pain and pain-related stimuli is considered central to disability and reduced quality of life. ACT seeks to decrease the impact of negatively experienced thoughts, emotions and physical sensations (i.e. defusion and acceptance) in order to increase the individual’s ability to act effectively in accordance with long-term goals and values (psychological or behavioral flexibility; McCracken and Morley, 2014).

Key learning objectives

This workshop will present an ACT approach for working with chronic pain. The clinical areas that will be covered include defusion, acceptance and values, and these areas will also be discussed in relation to core clinical aspects, e.g. exposure and motivation, within the broader CBT field. Also, recent scientific findings in the area of ACT and chronic pain as well as future research will be presented and discussed. The learning objectives are to provide: (1) a basic understanding of core clinical strategies in ACT and how these relate to key clinical areas in CBT; and (2) an overview of the current empirical status of ACT for chronic pain and future areas of research.

Training modalities: 

The workshop will be provided in a combined format including lectures and clinical training by means of e.g. case illustrations and exercises.

 Key references:

Veehof, M. M., Trompetter, H. R., Bohlmeijer, E. T., & Schreurs, K. M. G. (2016). Acceptance- and mindfulness-based interventions for the treatment of chronic pain: a meta-analytic review (Vol. 45, pp. 5-31): Routledge.

McCracken, LM, Morley, S. (2014) The psychological flexibility model: a basis for integration and progress in psychological approaches to chronic pain management. J Pain, 15(3), 221-34

Brief description of workshop leader(s)

Mike Kemani (clinical psychologist, Ph.D) has worked clinically with chronic pain in adults, adolescents and children since 2007 at the Behavioral Pain Medicine Treatment Services at the Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm. His doctoral thesis focused on efficacy and processes of change in ACT for chronic pain in adults, and he has authored and co-authored several scientific articles in the area of chronic pain. He also regularly gives lectures and presentations in the areas of ACT and chronic pain. He currently holds a position at the Karolinska University Hospital combining clinical work and clinical research.

Implications for everyday clinical practice of CBT

The workshops aims to provide empirically supported clinical interventions that in a straightforward manner can be integrated with the attendee’s current therapeutic framework.

 

Professor Timothy Carey
Co-leader: Sara Tai, University of Manchester

Affiliation: Centre for Remote Health, Flinders University, Alice Springs, Australia

Title: Making Cognitive Therapy Work: A focus on principles

 

Abstract

Workshop Leaders: Professor Tim Carey is Director of the Centre for Remote Health in Alice Springs. He is a clinician-researcher who has been developing a transdiagnostic cognitive therapy (the Method of Levels, MOL) in Australia and the UK since the late 1990’s. He has conducted highly successful training workshops in the UK, Canada, and Australia.

Dr Sara Tai is Senior Lecturer in Clinical Psychology at Manchester University. She is an experienced practitioner, researcher, and trainer of CBT and MOL. She provides supervision and workshops internationally and is involved in research on psychoses and bipolar disorders in China, USA, Europe, and the UK.

Scientific Background and Description of Workshop: Clinicians who provide evidence-based treatments for the wide range of problems patients present with are faced with numerous challenges. Often, patient’s descriptions of their problem don’t match the problem outlined in the referral. Moreover, comorbid presentations are the rule rather than the exception; yet many treatments are designed to be disorder specific. Furthermore, while treatments are designed to be provided in regular weekly or fortnightly schedules they are often delivered according to a variable and unpredictable schedule due to cancelled and missed appointments by patients. Finally, many treatments emphasise the utilisation of various unique and innovative strategies and techniques yet many of these activities actually reflect common underlying evidence-based principles of effective treatment. A therapy therefore that could be applied transdiagnostically, according to a variable treatment session schedule, and based on robust principles of psychological distress and psychological change, would be extremely useful for primary care clinicians. In this workshop, three important principles that are frequently mentioned in the literature and are integral to the provision of effective and efficient cognitive therapy will be described and explained through practical examples.. The principles are: control; conflict; and reorganisation. The importance of control to people’s mental health and general wellbeing is emphasised repeatedly throughout the literature. When control is not mentioned explicitly, concepts such as regulation and self-determination point to the same principle. Conflict (incongruence, dissonance, dilemmas, or being in two minds) is also referred to frequently in the literature. Conflict is a general formulation underlying the distress that manifests in various symptom patterns. People become psychologically distressed when they want to achieve two incompatible goals at the same time. An example of such a conflict might be wanting to forget a past traumatic event but also wanting to remember it in order to understand how it happened and prevent it from happening again. Reorganisation is the third principle and it also has strong support in the literature. It is the process of change in which new perspectives, insights, and points of view are developed. This workshop will explain the way in which these three principles can be integrated to enhance the effectiveness of therapy by enabling clinicians to work flexibly and responsively.

The workshop will be presented by practicing clinicians and will equip participants with skills they will be able to use immediately in order to achieve the following outcomes in their practice:

• Increased therapist effectiveness through an expanded theoretical framework;

• Increased therapist confidence through a clearer understanding of how their practices promote therapeutic change for different patients with different problems;

• Increased patient satisfaction through the provision of effective and efficient treatment;

• Greater cohesiveness between therapeutic approaches through the recognition of fundamental commonalities; and,

• Increased therapist satisfaction in their own ability to work effectively with clients presenting with complex problems and comorbidities through a sound understanding of the transdiagnostic processes that techniques employ whenever they are effective.

 

Objectives:

By the end of the workshop the participants will have had opportunities to:

1. Relate three key therapeutic principles to their own therapeutic practice;

2. Examine their own implicit models of therapeutic change;

3. Learn techniques to promote the participation and engagement of patients;

4. Explore the problem solving process of psychological reorganisation and how best to promote it;

5. Trouble-shoot ways of addressing and overcoming common problems in therapy such as poor engagement and motivation; and,

6. Develop ways of delivering cognitive therapy flexibly and adaptively using transdiagnostic methods to ensure each patient receives the optimum amount of therapy.

Modalities: In this workshop a range of training modalities will be used including: didactic, group discussion and problem solving, role play, DVD demonstrations and experiential activities.

 

References:

1. Carey, T. A., Mansell, W., & Tai, S. J. (2015). Principles-based counselling and psychotherapy: A Method of Levels approach. London: Routledge.

2. Carey, T. A., Mansell, W., & Tai, S. J. (2014). A biopsychosocial model based on negative feedback and control. Frontiers of Human Neuroscience, 8, article 94. doi: 10.3389/fnhum.2014.00094

3. Carey, T. A., Mansell, W., Tai, S. J., & Turkington, D. (2014). Conflicted control systems: The neural architecture of trauma. Lancet Psychiatry, 1, 316-318.

 

Free

Dr Iftah Yovel

Affiliation: The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel

Title: Setting the Grounds for a Valued Change in ACT

 

Abstract:
Background

ACT practitioners are faced with several challenging tasks in the initial phase of therapy. During the first few sessions, therapists need to develop a useful, contextual formulation. Rather than focusing on symptom reduction, the emerging treatment plan should emphasize the client’s valued goals.
Establishing a good rapport with the client is important in all therapies, and in all types of CBT therapeutic relationships should be based on a strong sense of collaboration and transparency. On top on these, however, a fruitful treatment alliance in ACT is also contingent upon the somewhat elusive concept of “creative hopelessness”: early in treatment, therapists need to help clients recognize the futility of their most basic forms of coping strategies, and at the same time also provide viable alternatives. This last endeavor is rarely an easy one: these alternatives are often perceived as counterintuitive and even “illogical”, and merely attempting to explain their nature using common language tools may prove counterproductive. Perhaps most importantly, it is essential for the ACT therapist to deliver from the get-go a strong message of an active, behavioral approach, which is clearly and explicitly based on the psychological flexibility model. Finally, in addition to all the above undertakings, it is never too early to start working on the development of acceptance, mindfulness and defusion skills.

Objectives

This in-congress workshop, which is suitable for professionals with at least some familiarity with ACT, will focus on the critical initial phase of therapy. We will learn how it can be structured and easy to implement, compatible with this trans-diagnostic approach and relevant to a wide variety of cases (with or without a DSM diagnosis), but at the same time highly meaningful and idiosyncratically tailored to the specific individual. The key learning objectives are: (a) how to create a useful contextual, “label-free” case formulation, (b) effectively present the idea of creative hopelessness, using both verbal and non-verbal communication means, and based on the client’s own treatment objectives, (c) start practicing flexibility right from the beginning of therapy (e.g., before completing formal or informal assessment) using behavioral exercises, (d) utilize current scientific knowledge (e.g., Wegner’s paradoxical effects of suppression) and common cognitive and behavioral techniques (e.g., listening to treatment sessions at home) in the service of these objectives, and also to enable the early development of basic ACT skills such as acceptance and defusion.

Training Modalities

The workshop will be based on an interactive didactic style. Relevant research findings as well as actual case examples will be provided to support and illustrate key points.

References

Recommended Readings:
Hayes, S.C, Strosahl, K.D., & Wilson, K.G. (2012). Acceptance and commitment therapy: The process and practice of mindful change (2nd edition). New York, NY: The Guilford Press. (Chapters 4-6)

Harris, R. (2009). ACT Made Simple: An Easy-To-Read Primer on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy.Oakland, CA: New Harbinger. (Chapters 5-6)

Katz, B. A., Catane, S., & Yovel, I. (2016). Pushed by Symptoms, Pulled by Values: Promotion Goals Increase Motivation in Therapeutic Tasks. Behavior Therapy, 47(2),239-247.

Workshop Leader

Dr. Yovel’s research focuses on treatment components of current cognitive behavioral therapies, and he teaches graduate-level courses on ACT and mindfulness at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He completed his Ph.D. in clinical psychology at Northwestern University, and his internship and postdoctoral training at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School.

 

Dr Frank N Ryan

Affiliation: Imperial College, United Kingdom

Title: The Willpower Workshop: Improving outcomes in motivational and affective disorders

 

Abstract:
Background

Cognitive control, the essential ingredient of willpower, has been deemed a key construct in the Research Domains Criteria (RDoC) framework ( Insel et al, 2010). Willpower, the capacity to overcome impulses, maintain effort and pursue long term goals, is thus central to cognitive behaviour therapy across the clinical spectrum, but in particular where appetite, affect or motivation is distorted. When optimised, reward processing (another RDoC construct), can bolster willpower and sustain effort. Maintaining a valued goal in working memory, for example,promotes attentional engagement with goal congruent stimuli and reduces distraction. While executive functions such as working memory exercise a “top-down” influence on attentional deployment, recent evidence suggests that even arbitrary stimuli associated with reward (e.g. monetary gain) can invest these cues with salience. This is enduring for many months, suggesting that rewards can leverage automatic processes ( which happens naturalistically in addiction) to promote therapeutic change. Learning is modulated by neural reward activation and, given CBT’s origins in learning theory, is pivotal in the clinical arena. Accordingly,extant clinical trial and meta-analytic research shows that treatments such as behavioral activation and contingency management consistently generate strong effect sizes. The focus in both cases is amplifying or accentuating reward processing, which seems to boost motivation and overcome anhedonia in depression and enhance impulse control in addiction. These are archetypal “willpower reliant” outcomes. The workshop aims to urge practitioners to recognize and utilise the “motivational magnetism” of reward as a way of sustaining the cognitive effort that defines willpower.

Objectives

• Willpower is sustained by valuing and appreciating larger long term rewards rather than opting for smaller short term rewards.

• How to apply motivational interventions that boost commitment to change, including strategies that promote self-regulation such as goal maintenance and working memory training.

• Acceptance in the face of setbacks, a compassionate stance and the support of others helps sustain willpower.

Willpower can be fostered through a seven-stage programme

• Reinforcing effort in advance of outcome is crucial, as the rewards delivered by willed effort are often delayed.

• Willpower is a shared and hence limited resource that requires careful stewardship.

• Overcoming habits places particular demands on willpower.

• Selecting one goal at a time, or prioritising a series of specific sub-goals, optimises willpower.

• Willpower can be enhanced by practicing self-restraint in diverse domains and the promotion of cognitive and neural fitness.

• Compassion and optimism foster willpower; emotional negativity depletes it.

• Willpower is usually challenged in ways that can be anticipated, allowing for coping strategies to be rehearsed in session.

Training modalities

The workshop will be interactive from the outset. It include a video presentation, experiential exercises and presentation of relevant scientific and clinical findings.The workshop should be relevant to practitioners who encounter clients presenting with emotional disorders, addictive disorders, or those aiming to sustain lifestyle or dietary changes linked to health concerns. Willpower is a well-accepted and usually nonjudgemental term with which to engage therapist and client into collaborative work aiming to boost effort, build resilience and learn from setbacks.

References

Ryan, F. and Skandali, N. (Eds) (2016) Reward processing in motivational and affective disorders:

http://journal.frontiersin.org

Ryan, F (2014) Willpower For Dummies. John Wiley & Sons.

Insel, T., Cuthbert, B., Garvey, M., Heinssen, R., Pine, D. S., Quinn, K., … & Wang, P. (2010).

Research domain criteria (RDoC): toward a new classification framework for research on mental disorders. American Journal of Psychiatry. 167(7):748-51

Workshop Leader

Frank Ryan is a cognitive behavioural therapist who works with people with substance misuse and associated problems. He is a Lead Clinical Psychologist for Camden & Islington NHS Mental Health Trust Substance Misuse Division in London and an Honorary Senior Lecturer at Imperial College Faculty of Medicine. He is the author of Cognitive Therapy for Addiction: Motivation and Change, Wiley, 2013 and Willpower for Dummies, Wiley-Blackwell, 2014

 

 

Pietro Muratori
Co-leader: Maria Helander, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Laura Ruglioni, IRCCS Fondazione Stella Maris, Italy

Affiliation: IRCCS Fondazione Stella Maris, Italy

Title: Coping Power for children with aggressive behavioral problems

 

Abstract:
Background

This workshop will provide an overview of the Coping Power program. The Coping Power Program, typically delivered as a small group intervention, has a 34 session child component and a 16 session parent component, although shorter versions and individually-delivered versions have been tested.

Coping Power was developed for use with at-risk children, but has been adapted for use in different settings. Previous studies have examined its use with children with Oppositional Defiant Disorder and Conduct Disorder diagnosis, treated in outpatient clinics. We will review US and Dutch intervention research findings supporting this program effectiveness, and findings supporting the implementation in Swedish and Italian mental health services. Clinicians attending the workshop will be able to identify preadolescent children who are appropriate for intervention; to describe how the Coping Power model provides a framework for the assessment and intervention of specific children; and to implement tools to help the child recognize physiological cues of anger and manage their anger arousal, and to identify competent strategies for coping with social problems.

Objectives

To individuate who are appropriate for Coping Power. To know the contextual social cognitive model, a risk factors framework for Disruptive Behavior in children. To implement strategies and techniques provided in Coping Power.

Training modalities

Didactic and role play.

References

– Lochman, J. E., & Wells, K. C. (2002). Contextual social-cognitive mediators and child outcome: A test of the theoretical model in the Coping Power Program. Development and Psychopathology, 14, 945967.

-Muratori, P., Milone, A., Manfredi, A., Polidor

Workshop Leaders

Pietro Muratori has been working as clinical psychologist in outpatients clinic for children and adolescent with Disruptive Behaviour Disorder. He led research and intervention projects about efficacy and dissemination of the Coping Power Program in Italian clinical contexts. His main research area are related to clinical profiles in children and adolescent with Disruptive Behaviour Disorder diagnosis and primary prevention of childhood aggression.

Maria Helander has been working as clinical psychologist in Child and Adolescents psychiatry for 14 years. She has led the project of developing clinical guidelines for assessing and treating Disruptive Behavioral disorders within Child and Adolescent psychiatry in Stockholm. She is currently leading a research project examining the additive effect of the child component in the Coping Power Program to the Swedish Parent Management Training program KOMET.

 

 

Dr Sanjay Rao

Affiliation: The Royal Ottawa Mental Health Centre & University of Ottawa, Canada

Title: Transdiagnostic Experiential CBT for Rumination

 

Abstract:
Background

Rumination is a phenomenon which can derail therapy. It is defined as repeated negative thinking about the past. It may have functional adaptive role in normal populations but is associated with poor outcomes in depression. However rumination may go undetected if it is not explicitly examined in patients. The phenomenon also occurs in other conditions like post-traumatic stress disorder, social anxiety disorder etc. Meta-analytic reviews have shown rumination as a strong predictor of psychopathology (Aldao, Nolen-Hoeksema & Schweiser 2010). Watkins and Nolen- Hoeksema (2014) conceptualised rumination as a habit to develop a rationale for treatment.

Several interventions have been tried for rumination including cognitive behavioural, mindfulness and meta-cognitive approaches. Watkins et al (2011, 2012) developed a concreteness training approach to rumination and showed some initial success in treatment trials.

Despite the above research practical approaches to dealing with rumination in therapy sessions have not been made explicit. The purpose of this workshop is to develop skills in recognizing this commonly occurring phenomenon and learn interventions using a structured approach. The interventions involves understanding the adaptive and maladaptive role of rumination, analyzing the process and content of rumination, tracking rumination and applying a stepped approach to intervention for rumination.Rumination will be approached as a behaviour as well as a cognitive process with emotion processing implications. Participants will be able to practice a template for intervention using exercises, role plays and discussions. They will also receive practical tips on how to prevent rumination from hijacking the therapeutic alliance. Techniques will be derived from a range of cognitive behavioral schools (behavioral, cognitive, mindfulness and metacognitive awareness approaches).

Objectives

1. Defining and detecting rumination from history, homework and in session interactions

2. Developing a systematic stepped transdiagnostic approach to rumination

3. Practise of skills from the 3 waves of CBT which can be applied to rumination

4. Methods of measuring outcomes of rumination interventions in clinical practise

Training Modalities

Experiential exercises on rumination, brief presentations and role plays. A systematic stepped approach will be used for delivering the intervention for rumination. Case examples of successes with rumination will also be provided.

References

Aldao A, Nolen-Hoeksema S, Schweizer S. Emotion-regulation strategies across psychopathology: A meta-analytic review. Clinical psychology review. 2010;30:217-237.

Watkins ER, Nolen-Hoeksema S. A habit-goal framework of depressive rumination. Journal of abnormal psychology. 2014;123:24-34.

Watkins ER, Mullan E, Wingrove J, Rimes K, Steiner H, Bathurst N, Eastman R, Scott J. Rumination-focused cognitive-behavioural therapy for residual depression: phase II randomised controlled trial.

The British journal of psychiatry : the journal of mental science. 2011;199:317-322.

Workshop Leader

Dr Sanjay Rao is the Clinical Director of the mood and anxiety programme of the Royal Ottawa Hospital and Associate Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Ottawa and Dalhousie. He has trained in all the three waves of CBT and developed CBT services in UK and Canada. He developed a unique distance delivery intensive programme of CBT in for the province of Nova Scotia and reduced waiting times for CBT access. In the UK he was awarded North of England Doctor of the Year for improving access to CBT. He has delivered over 200 workshops in CBT and supervised students from different professional backgrounds. Dr Rao’s teaching approach is experiential and uses skills from all the 3 waves of CBT.

 

 

.full-width-5a2f8dc03f13f { min-height:100px; padding:10px 0 10px; margin-bottom:10px; } #background-layer--5a2f8dc03f13f { background-position:left top; background-repeat:repeat; ; }

Friday September 2, 14:00 – 17:00

Erik Andersson

Affiliation: Karolinska Institutet, Sweden

Title: CBT for OCD with comorbid Autism (adult patients)

 

Abstract:

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is often accompanied with autism-spectrum disorders or autism-related symptoms. These patients often have considerable deficiencies in executive- and social functioning, which, in turn, may affect treatment outcome. The literature and research on OCD with comorbid Autism is limited and clinicians need to understand this patient group better.

In this workshop, we will first go through the evidence base regarding diagnostics and treatment alternatives for Autism-related OCD. Several case examples will be presented, and participants in this workshop will have the opportunity to analyze and discuss different problems that may arise in therapy. One particular focus will be on how to work with the patient´s context i.e. school, work, family, and home support. The focus here is to provide clinicians with hands-on experience on how to handle common difficulties when treating this patient group.

Key learning objectives:
  • Understand OCD in the context of Autism-related deficiencies and information processes
  • Be able to conduct a behavior analysis on a case-example of Autism-related OCD with multiple difficulties
  • Understand the role of the context for this patient group

 

About the presenter:

Erik Andersson is a clinical psychologist and PhD  at Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden. Erik works is specialized in treating adult OCD patients and has extensive experience in working with patients with Autism-related conditions. Erik conducts treatment reserach on psychological treatments for OCD and related conditions.

 

Key references:
  • Bejerot, S. (2007). An autistic dimension: a proposed subtype of obsessive-compulsive disorder. Autism : the International Journal of Research and Practice, 11(2), 101–110. doi:10.1177/1362361307075699
  • Russell, A. J., Jassi, A., Fullana, M. A., Mack, H., Johnston, K., Heyman, I., et al. (2013). Cognitive behavior therapy for comorbid obsessive-compulsive disorder in high-functioning autism spectrum disorders: a randomized controlled trial. Depression and Anxiety, 30(8), 697–708. doi:10.1002/da.22053

 

.full-width-5a2f8dc041d51 { min-height:100px; padding:10px 0 10px; margin-bottom:10px; } #background-layer--5a2f8dc041d51 { background-position:left top; background-repeat:repeat; ; }
Professor Glenn Waller

Affiliation: University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom

Title: Cognitive-behavioural therapy for eating disorders: How to deliver evidence-based treatment in real-life clinical settings

 

Abstract

Workshop Leaders: Glenn Waller is Professor of Clinical Psychology at the University of Sheffield. He has worked in the eating disorders for over 25 years, developing evidence-based approaches. He is lead author of two books on CBT for eating disorders, and has contributed over 20 book chapters. He has published over 250 peer-reviewed papers, including studies of the effective treatment of eating disorders in routine clinical practice. He has presented and trained clinicians in many national and international settings. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Eating Disorders, and is a Past President of that organization.

Scientific Background and Description of Workshop: This workshop will address the key clinical skills that are needed for working with eating disorders using CBT. It will briefly consider the evidence base, including evidence that the approach presented here is effective. It will then consider the therapeutic principles that clinicians need to adopt to ensure that the therapy has the best chance of being effective (e.g., focusing on early change; dealing with our own anxiety; getting the therapeutic relationship right; actually delivering the therapy; the role of supervision; knowing when to stop).

The majority of the session will involve learning the key skills that any CBT therapist should be using when treating the eating disorders, regardless of specific diagnosis. The aim will be to address the ‘broken cognition’ that characterises these disorders. The skills will be focused on what the patient needs for recovery, and will be addressed using didactic presentation, case examples and interactive methods. The skills will include: risk management; monitoring and weighing; formulation of behaviours and cases; improving eating; exposure with response prevention; cognitive restructuring; behavioural experiments; surveys; and handling endings. There will be particular consideration given to the methods needed to improve body image, as this is such a strong risk factor for relapse.

 

Objectives:

1. Understanding the cognitive and behavioural pathology of the eating disorders.

2. Adopting an appropriate therapeutic stance, based on key principles of effective CBT.

3. Using existing CBT techniques to deliver evidence-based CBT for eating disorders.

 

Modalities:

A combination of didactic, case presentation, interactive discussion and role play.

 

References:

Waller, G., Cordery, H., Corstorphine, E., Hinrichsen, H., Lawson, R., Mountford, V., & Russell, K. (2007). Cognitive-behavioral therapy for the eating disorders: A comprehensive treatment guide. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Turner, H., Marshall, E., Stopa, L., & Waller, G. (2015). Cognitive-behavioural therapy for outpatients with eating disorders: effectiveness for a transdiagnostic group in a routine clinical setting. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 68, 70-75.

Waller, G., Gray, E., Hinrichsen, H., Mountford, V., Lawson, R., & Patient, E. (2014). Individualized cognitive behavioural therapy for bulimia nervosa and atypical bulimic cases: Generalisability of effectiveness to clinical settings. International Journal of Eating Disorders, 47, 13-17.

 

.full-width-5a2f8dc0431f9 { min-height:100px; padding:10px 0 10px; margin-bottom:10px; } #background-layer--5a2f8dc0431f9 { background-position:left top; background-repeat:repeat; ; }

Friday September 2, 14:00 – 15:30

Free Mini Workshop

DR. ROBERT JOHANSSON

Affiliation: Karolinska Insitutet, Sweden

Title: Writing the code for ICBT web applications: A technical demonstration of the development process

 

Abstract:
Scientific background

The Internet has become a cornerstone of CBT during the last 15 years. Internet-delivered CBT (ICBT) has gained a substantial evidence base with well beyond 100 randomized controlled trials supporting its efficacy.

ICBT requires not only treatment material suitable for delivery through the Internet (for example in the form of self-help texts). A web application is also required that for example enables functionality for communication, delivery of treatment content and the possibility to collect assessments in self-report format. Many clinics and clinicians do not have access to such a treatment application and hence cannot provide ICBT even if they have access to treatment material and clinical expertise.

While several web-based solutions for treatment delivery exist, we seldom talk about the actual development process of these applications. For many people, the task of developing a web-based ICBT treatment application can look like a massive challenge. While the task requires some basic knowledge about programming and web technologies, it is far easier than one can think.

A key for this process to work is to use a programming language that provides expressive power, high performance, and that is possible to integrate with modern web technologies.

In this demonstration we will use a programming language called Clojure that has become increasingly popular during the last years. The language is easy to learn and has a large ecosystem of freely available libraries that makes the process of developing a web application similar to LEGO construction.

During the talk, the workshop leader will show with actual programming code, how to construct a fully functional web-based application for ICBT treatment delivery. The system constructed during the talk will include different views for therapists and clients, access right management, encryption, database connection, logging, the possibility to automatically summarize collected self-report data, automatic change of presentation for smartphones and tablets, etc. Throughout the workshop, every step will be explained in detail.

Objectives

– Understand which web technologies are required for building an ICBT web application

– Take part of a demonstration of important steps in the development process of web-based ICBT treatment applications

– Understand the benefits of using the programming language Clojure for this task

– Gain knowledge on how to go further with an interest in developing your own ICBT web application

Implications for everyday clinical practice of CBT

The Internet has become a key modality for the clinical practice of CBT. However, outside of research settings, there exist few options for clinicians to use the Internet to communicate with their clients, to provide treatment material and to collect self-report data. This workshop will show how it is possible to develop web applications for ICBT with only a basic skill-set in programming and web technologies.

Training modalities

1.5-hour technical demonstration

References

Andersson, G. (2014). The Internet and CBT: A Clinical Guide

Vlaescu, G., Carlbring, P., Lunner, T., & Andersson, G. (2015). An e-platform for rehabilitation of persons with hearing problems. American Journal of Audiology, 24, 271-275.

Workshop Leader

Robert Johansson completed his PhD in clinical psychology from Linköping University in 2013. His research has mainly focused on developing and evaluating Internet-based treatments for depression. Besides ICBT research, he has conducted several studies on Internet-delivered psychodynamic psychotherapy and also research about the effectiveness and working mechanisms of a form of psychotherapy called Intensive Short-term Dynamic Psychotherapy. During the last years, he has developed an interest in the construction of software relevant for clinical psychology research and practice. He is currently working as a postdoc researcher in Research Group Kaldo, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Back to top
Maria Bragesjö

Affiliation: Karolinska Insitutet, Sweden

Title: Imaginal exposure within the context of prolonged Exposure

 

Abstract
Background

PTSD is a highly prevalent, often chronic and disabling psychiatric disorder that is associated with significant adverse health and life consequences. Fortunately, there is compelling evidence that cognitive-behavioral therapies, notably exposure therapies, are effective in reducing PTSD symptomology. Prolonged exposure is a specific exposure therapy program that is considered a first-line evidence based treatment for PTSD.

Imaginal exposure is one of the key components of prolonged exposure and this mini workshop will focus on imaginal exposure and its use within that context, and how to most effectively conduct that important part of the treatment.

Training modalities

The training will include a brief lecture part, followed by a technical demonstration and role plays.

Objectives

By the end of the workshop the participants will have a good understanding of why imaginal exposure is a vital part of prolonged exposure and also have gained knowledge of how to practically do imaginal exposure in an effective way. The mini-workshop is aimed both to people new to prolonged exposure as well as to people familiar to the method who want an opportunity to practice imaginal exposure and develop skills to conduct it in a more effective way.

References

Foa, E, E., Hembree & B. Rothbaum (2007) Prolonged Exposure Therapy for PTSD: Therapist Guide. Emotional processing of traumatic experiences. Oxford.

Foa, E.B., Gillihan, S. J. & Bryant, R. A. Challenges and Successes in Dissemination of Evidence-Based Treatments for Posttraumatic Stress: Lessons Learned From Prolonged Exposure Therapy for PTSD. (2013) Psychological Science in the Public Interest, p 1–47

Workshop Leader

Maria Bragesjö is a clinical psychologist and licensed psychotherapist with extensive experience in treating cases with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) with different types of traumas, especially cases with a comorbidity of dissociation, self-harming behaviors and suicidality. Maria Bragesjö is a certified therapist, supervisor and trainer in prolonged exposure. At the moment she is also enrolled as a PhD-student at Karolinska Institutet investigating if an early psychological intervention after trauma can prevent the onset of PTSD.

 

.full-width-5a2f8dc04429c { min-height:100px; padding:10px 0 10px; margin-bottom:10px; } #background-layer--5a2f8dc04429c { background-position:left top; background-repeat:repeat; ; }

Saturday September 3, 08:30 – 12:00

Additional cost

Stirling Moorey

Affiliation: South London and Maudsley NHS Trust, United Kingdom

Title: Working with Interpersonal Process in CBT Supervision

Abstract:
Background:

CBT prides itself on its ability to establish a collaborative client-therapist relationship,
and the effectiveness of this partnership approach has been demonstrated in numerous randomised controlled trial. As therapists work with increasingly complex cases they are faced with challenges to collaborative empiricism, and the importance of understanding the interpersonal processes arising in the session becomes highly relevant. This workshop is aims to give CBT supervisors a model for understanding the interpersonal process of the therapy session and the supervision session. The workshop will describe how cognitive models have been used by theoreticians from psychodynamic (e.g. Bowlby and Horowitz), cognitive behavioural (e.g. Safran and Segal) and integrative (e.g. Ryle) traditions to understand the therapy relationship. It will explore how the concept of interpersonal schemas can help to make sense of the patient’s reactions to us and our reactions to them. Difficulties in therapy will be conceptualized in terms of the interaction between the therapist’s and the patient’s beliefs/rules about self, others, and relationships – resulting in ‘schema congruence’, ‘schema conflict’ or ‘schema complementarity’. Supervisors can make use of this to help their supervisees understand alliance ruptures. The same method will be applied to understanding problems in the supervisor-supervisee relationship. A simple method for tracking these interactions will be introduced and participants will have the opportunity to apply it to their own cases.

 

Objectives:

Participants will
1. understand how problems in the therapy and supervisory relationships can be described in terms of interpersonal schemas.
2. understand how ‘transference’ and ‘countertransference’ can be translated into cognitive behavioural language.
3. be able to use the interpersonal schema worksheet to map therapist-client and supervisor-supervisee interactions.
4. practice using the worksheet to identify ways out of the unhelpful cycles of interaction that can get set up in therapy and in supervision.

 

Training Modalities:

1. Didactic and through large and small group discussion.
2. Demonstration role plays.
3. Skills role plays based on vignettes and participants’ own cases.
4. Small group work using the interpersonal schema worksheet as a tool for identifying and interrupting maladaptive interpersonal patterns.

 

References:

1. Moorey “Is it them or is it me?”Transference and Countertransference in CBT in Whittington & Grey eds. How to become a more effective CBT therapist (Wiley, 2014).
2. Kennerley Developing and Maintaining a Working Alliance in CBT in Whittington & Grey.

 

Leaders:

Stirling Moorey is Consultant Psychiatrist in CBT at the South London and Maudsley Trust and Visiting Senior Lecturer at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience. He has 30 years experience of training and supervising psychologist, psychiatrists and other health professionals in CBT, and was a co-founder and continuing contributor to the IOP Postgraduate Diploma in CBT. He has written on CBT in general, psycho-oncology and CBT in adversity. He has recently contributed a chapter on interpersonal process in CBT to How to become a more effective CBT therapist (Whittington & Grey, 2014)

.full-width-5a2f8dc045e07 { min-height:100px; padding:10px 0 10px; margin-bottom:10px; } #background-layer--5a2f8dc045e07 { background-position:left top; background-repeat:repeat; ; }
John Swan
Co-leader: Marianne Liebing-Wilson. NHS Tayside and University of Dundee

Affiliation: University of Dundee, Dundee, United Kingdom

Title: Cognitive Behavioural Analysis System of Psychotherapy (CBASP) for Persistent Depressive Disorder

 

Abstract

Workshop Leaders: John is a Clinical Senior Lecturer and Course Director for the Post Graduate Training Programme in Cognitive Behavioural Psychotherapy hosted by the University of Dundee. Marianne is a Senior Adult Psychotherapist and Co-Director of the above training programme. In addition, both are trained and accredited practitioners of CBASP having worked closely with the originator of CBASP, Prof. James McCullough. Both are active clinicians specialising in the teaching and practice of chronic/persistent depression specific psychological therapies

Scientific Background and Description of Workshop: Significant numbers of people suffer from Persistent or Chronic Depression in which clinically low mood and associated symptoms continue unabated for two or more years but which may become a lifelong problem without effective treatment. Patients with Chronic Depression present particular challenges to psychological therapists that other depression specific psychotherapies have not been able to address. In Cognitive Behavioural Analysis System of Psychotherapy, (CBASP), patients learn how their current cognitive and behavioural repertoires produce and perpetuate interpersonal problems. Using a social problem solving algorithm known as Situational Analysis, they are then taught how to alter maladaptive patterns of interpersonal behaviour to improve the probability of achieving more salubrious outcomes desired outcomes in their social world.

CBASP is an interesting and challenging therapy to learn and is focussed on meeting the needs of those depressed patients who meet criteria for chronic depression. Though CBASP is related to CBT, there are aspects of the model that are substantially different.

 

Objectives:

1. To introduce participants to this new psychotherapy which is to date, the only therapy specifically designed to meet the clinical requirements of chronically depressed individuals.

2 Describe and outline the therapy process and key mechanisms of change using examples to illustrate the techniques specific to CBASP.

3. The theoretical model underpinning CBASP will be outlined.

4. Data from a UK based two year case series will be presented to underpin aspects of the application of the model (see references section)

Modalities: An active workshop combining the communication of information and concepts coupled with the opportunity to hear/see, using examples of practice captured on DVD, actual examples of CBASP therapy being delivered. There will be the opportunity to discuss and rehearse the main techniques of CBASP in role-play exercises.

 

References:

MCCULLOUGH, J. P. 2000. Treatment for Chronic Depression: Cognitive Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy (CBASP), New York, Guilford.

SWAN, J. S., & HULL, A.M. 2007. The cognitive behavioural analysis system of psychotherapy: a new psychotherapy for chronic depression. Advances in Psychiatric Treatment, 13, 458-469.

SWAN, J. S., MACVICAR, R., CHRISTMAS, D., DURHAM, R., RAUCHHAUS, P., MCCULLOUGH, J. P. & MATTHEWS, K. 2014. Cognitive Behavioural Analysis System of Psychotherapy (CBASP) for chronic depression: Clinical characteristics and six month clinical outcomes in an open case series. Journal of affective disorders, 152, 268-276.

 

.full-width-5a2f8dc0473bd { min-height:100px; padding:10px 0 10px; margin-bottom:10px; } #background-layer--5a2f8dc0473bd { background-position:left top; background-repeat:repeat; ; }
Poul Perris

Affiliation: Swedish Institute for Cognitive Behaviour Therapy and Schema Therapy, Sweden

Co-leader: Carl Gyllenhammar Swedish Institute for CBT & Schema Therapy, Sweden

Title: The Art of Empathic Confrontation: How to by-pass dysfunctional coping behaviors within the therapeutic relationship

 

Abstract:
Leaders:

Poul Perris, MD, Lic Psychotherapist. Carl Gyllenhammar, MD, Lic Psychotherapist. Both holds an Advanced Level Certification in Schema Therapy. Perris and Gyllenhammar introduced Schema Therapy in Sweden and have offered Schema Therapy training programs since 2005. Perris is the founding President of the International Society of Schema Therapy, (ISST) and current President of the Swedish Association for Cognitive and Behavioral Therapies. Gyllenhammar is the ISST coordinator for training and certification, (Swedish branch).

 

Background:

A common roadblock for change in therapy is treating clients with dysfunctional coping behaviors within the therapeutic relationship, e.g. clients that are emotionally

detached, overly compliant or verbally attacking the therapist. Empathic confrontation is an interpersonal strategy used in Schema Therapy in order to by-pass these behaviors without raising resistance for change. On the contrary empathic confrontation will help reinforcing the therapeutic bond and enhance motivation for change. Schema Therapy is an innovative psychotherapy developed by Dr. Jeffrey Young for personality disorders, chronic depression, and other difficult individual and couples problems. Schema Therapy integrates elements of CBT,

Attachment theory and Gestalt therapy into one unified and systematic approach to treatment.

 

Objectives:

The presenters will give an overview of Schema Therapy and discuss its key conceptual components, i.e. Core Emotional Needs, Early Maladaptive Schemas, Coping Styles and Modes. They will outline the overall treatment philosophy of clients with interpersonal problems with a focus on empathic confrontation of dysfunctional coping behaviors. The participants will learn how to conceptualize dysfunctional coping behaviors using the Schema Therapy model, be informed about key maintenance factors of these behaviors and practice how to perform effective empathic confrontation.

 

Training Modalities:

The workshop will contain video demonstrations, live role-plays performed by the presenters and dyadic role-plays among the participants. Key interventions that will be illustrated and practiced are empathic confrontation and multiple chair techniques.

 

References:

Gyllenhammar & Perris, (2016): Schematerapi – En klinisk handbok, Natur & Kultur.
Young & Klosko, (2003): Schema Therapy A Practitioners Guide, Guilford Press

 

Free

Dennis Pusch

Affiliation: Alberta Health Services, Canada

Co-leader: Chantelle Klassen, Alberta Health Services, Canada

Title: Developing a trauma-informed treatment option in primary care: A skills-based model for patients with adverse childhood experiences (ACEs)

 

Abstract:
Background

The landmark Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) study in San Diego, California, provided remarkable evidence of a strong relationship between exposure to childhood emotional, physical and sexual abuse and/or household dysfunction and subsequent elevations in health risk behaviors, addiction, and disease in adulthood (Felitti et al., 1998). Subsequent research has also clearly demonstrated the relationship between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and adult physical and mental health (Bellis, Lowey, et al., 2014). In spite of the demonstrated relationship between adverse childhood experiences and poor health outcomes in adulthood, very little effort in primary care settings has been directed towards the identification of adults who have experienced childhood trauma. Not surprisingly, adults with high ACE histories have been found to be particularly frequent consumers of services in primary care clinics. Primary care is thus a desirable setting for identifying adults with significant developmental trauma experiences and offering validated treatments to help offset the possible development of future health problems. In this workshop, participants will learn about the development of a Calgarybased treatment specifically created for adults with high ACE histories. The treatment was developed with input from a variety of mental health and medical clinicians with experience in treating patients with trauma, but was also informed by a) a comprehensive literature review that covered both skills-based and reprocessing approaches to the treatment of trauma, and b) ongoing input from an advisory group comprised of adult patients who had significant ACE histories themselves. This innovative treatment has been offered in primary care settings in an open trial, supported by a robust relationship that has existed between approximately 50 mental health clinicians and over 800 family physicians in the greater Calgary area. The treatment process in the trial was initiated by family physicians who screened adult patients for ACEs and were trained in discussing the resultant ACE scores, and the treatment was offered in 6 session groups. This workshop will present the rationale and process used in developing the treatment, the specific content of the treatment, and feedback about the treatment provided by both primary care providers and patients.

Objectives

1. Describe the process used to develop the treatment

2. Outline the content of treatment and the supporting evidence-based research

3. Review in detail the skills-based content of each of the 6 group sessions

4. Share the evaluative results of the treatment from primary care providers and patients

Training modalities

• Presentation and discussion

• Interactive exercises with participants to share skills-based content

References

• Felitti, V. J., Anda, R. R., Nordenberg, D., Williamson, D. F., Spitz, A. M., Edwards, V., Marks, J. S. (1998). Relationship of childhood abuse and household dysfunction to many of the leading causes of death in adults. American Journal of Preventative Medicine, 14(4), 245-258.

• Bellis, M. A., Lowey, H., Leckenby, N., Hughes, K., & Harrison, D. (2014). Adverse childhood experiences: Retrospective study to determine their impact on adult health behaviors and health outcomes in a UK population. Journal of Public Health, 36(1), 81-91.

Workshop Leaders

Chantelle is a psychologist who works as a Behavioural Health Consultant in a number of family medicine clinics in Calgary, Alberta. She has a long-standing clinical interest in adults with childhood trauma histories, and serves as the chair of the ACE’s-Alberta Treatment Development Group. She previously served as the clinical supervisor of a program for women who were the victims of domestic violence.

 

Professor Larissa Niec

Affiliation: Central Michigan University, United States

Co-leader: Professor Elizabeth Brestan, Auburn University, United States; Willemite Heiner, Mentaal Beter, The Netherlands; Mariëlle Abrahamse, de Bascule and the Academic Medical Center, the Netherlands, Central Michigan University, United States; Frederique Coelman

Title: Parent-Child Interaction Therapy: Innovative Interventions Growing
From the Roots of Behavioral Theory 

Abstract:
Background

Conduct-disordered behavior in young children is a costly public health concern that poses significant challenges for society as a whole (Honeycutt, Khavjou, Jones, Cuellar, & Forehand, 2015). Without effective treatment, conduct-disordered behavior in children can lead to serious difficulties in broad areas of functioning, including difficulties in family, peer, school, and community interactions (Broidy et al., 2003). Parent management training (PMT) programs that are based on behavioral principles and involve parents as the primary agents of change are considered best practice in the reduction of conduct problems (Eyberg, Nelson, & Boggs, 2008). PMT programs that target at-risk children at an early age have a more significant impact compared to interventions which are provided five to ten years later, when behavior patterns have become more persistent (Heckman, 2006; Tremblay, 2006). Rooted in behavioral theory and child-centered play therapy, Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) is an innovative, evidence-based PMT program for children two- to seven-years-of-age with serious conduct problems. PCIT includes two phases of treatment designed to improve the parent-child relationship, reduce clinically significant child conduct problems, and increase effective parenting (e.g., Niec, Eyberg, & Chase, 2011; Eyberg & Funderburk, 2011). The efficacy of PCIT has been supported by rigorous studies within the US and globally (Cooley, Veldorale-Griffin, Petren, & Mullis, 2014; Thomas & Zimmer-Gembeck, 2007). PCIT is unique from most PMT programs in that it (1) is assessment driven (e.g., families progress through treatment when they demonstrate mastery of the parenting skills); (2) includes parents and children in each session; and (3) provides parents with in vivo feedback (“coaching”) by therapists during interactions with their children. PCIT contains the treatment components associated with larger effect sizes in the reduction of childhood conduct problems and the improvement of parenting skills (Kaminski, Valle, Filene, & Boyle, 2008).

From the roots of PCIT, strong branches have grown that include new, innovative models of service delivery (e.g., time-limited prevention models of PCIT; group PCIT) and adaptations to address different types of child psychopathology (e.g., developmental delays, anxiety, depression). This workshop will provide attendees with an understanding of the roots of PCIT and an overview of the new branches. Specifically, we will include discussion of the (1) theory underlying the intervention, (2) research supporting the intervention, and (3) techniques and core components of the intervention.

We will consider the implications for clinical practice in order to maximize the benefits for children and families in need of treatment.

Objectives

Participants who successfully complete the workshop will be able to

1. Identify the ‘roots’ and core elements of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy, an evidence-based intervention for young children with conduct problems.

2. Describe the three primary, family-oriented goals of PCIT.

3. Understand the specific skills that are taught to parents in both phases of PCIT.

4. Describe the new innovations of PCIT meant to increase access to care for families.

5. Understand the latest adaptations of PCIT for children with different types of disorders (e.g., autism, anxiety).

Training modalities

In this workshop we will provide an overview of the PCIT model and will share the most current research findings regarding efficacy in global populations and the development of adaptations of the intervention. Training modalities will include lecture with audience participation and review and discussion of videos of actual PCIT cases. Role play and basic skill-building exercises will also be included.

References

Abrahamse, M. E., Junger, M., Van Wouwe, A. M. M., Boer, F., & Lindauer, R. J. L. (2015). Treating child disruptive behavior in high-risk families: A comparative effectiveness trial from a community-based implementation. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 1-18.

Niec., L. N., Barnett, M., Prewett, M., Shanley, J. (in press). Group parent-child interaction therapy: A randomized control trial for the treatment of conduct problems in young children. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology.

Niec, L. N., Eyberg, S., & Chase, R. (2011). Parent-child interaction therapy: Implementing and sustaining a treatment program for families of young children with disruptive behavior disorders. In A. Rubin (Ed.), Programs and interventions for maltreated children and families at risk. New Jersey: Wiley (pp. 61 – .69).

Russ, S. W., & Niec, L. N., Eds. (2011). Play in Clinical Practice: Evidence-Based Approaches. New York, NY, Guilford Press.

Workshop Leaders

Larissa N. Niec, PhD is Professor of Psychology and Director of the Center for Children, Families, and Communities at Central Michigan University. As a PCIT Master Trainer, Dr. Niec provides training for therapists nationally and internationally. Her research interests include adaptations of the PCIT model, prevention of childhood conduct problems, and dissemination of PCIT to underserved populations.

Elizabeth Brestan-Knight, PhD is a Professor in the Department of Psychology at Auburn University and a PCIT Master Trainer. Her research interests include the behavioral observation of parent-child interactions (using the DPICS), parent education, and PCIT dissemination and implementation.

Willemine Heiner is a clinical psychologist in private practice, a PCIT Trainer, and a supervising behavioral therapist at Mentaal Beter (Hoofddorp/IJmuiden, The Netherlands).

Mariëlle Abrahamse, PhD is a researcher at de Bascule and the Academic Medical Center (Amsterdam, The Netherlands) and a post-doctoral fellow at the Center for Children, Families, and Communities at Central Michigan University (United States).

Frederique Coelman is a PCIT Master Trainer in The Netherlands.

 

 

Niklas Törneke

Affiliation: NT Psykiatri, Sweden

Title: To start learning RFT

 

Abstract:
Background

Relational frame theory (RFT) is the theory and research program about human language and cognition that is at the base of acceptance and commitment therapy. At the same time RFT is much more than just ACT. As it concerns human language it concerns all human activity that involves
language, which of course makes it relevant to all human experience. In a very profound way RFT speaks to so diverse topics as our experience of ourselves, the so called future, our battle with the meaning of life and everyday problem solving. This workshop will present the basic conceptual tools used in RFT and explain basic terminology. It will not focus on research but on conceptual understanding needed for applying RFT to the human experience. A special focus will be given to clinical application of RFT for psychotherapy in general and ACT in particular.

Objectives

1. Participants will grasp the meaning of basic terminology used in RFT

2. Participants will be able to analyze areas such as problem-solving, the ability to follow instructions and the experience of self using concepts of RFT

3. Participants will be able to apply basic principles of RFT to clinical practice

 

Training modalities

Mainly didactic

 

References

Törneke, N. (2010) Learning RFT. An introduction to relational frame theory and it’s clinical applications. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger

Ramnerö, J. & Törneke, N. (2008) The ABCs of human behavior. Behavioral principles for the practicing clinician. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger

Villatte, M, Villatte, J. & Hayes, S. (2016) Mastering the clinical conversation. Language as intervention. New York: The Guilford Press.

 

Workshop Leaders

Psychiatrist, licensed psychotherapist in private practice. Peer reviewed trainer in acceptance and commitment therapy since 2003. Author of “Learning RFT- An introduction to relational frame theory and it’s clinical applications” and “ABCs of human behavior”, co-authored with Jonas Ramnerö

 

 

Mats Jacobson

Affiliation: Verksam Psykologi, Sweden

Co-leader: Erik Nilsson; Göteborgs och Södra Bohusläns FoU Råd, WeMind, Verksam Psykologi, Sweden

Title: The Unified Protocol for adults, adolescents and children: Emotion focused, transdiagnostic CBT

 

Abstract:
Background

The workshop will focus on disseminating current best practice of the UP for adults, adolescents and children, with examples from both individual and group formats. Since the body of research underlying the UP isn’t presented in book format but in scientific journals, and the UP integrates a broad, multi-disciplinary scientific basis, we will also highlight short summaries of the current scientific evidence for the demonstrations and exercises given during the workshop.

Objectives

-Practical understanding of the 8 modules in the UP and the applications for adults, adolescents and children

-Understanding of the distinguishing features of the UP and some of the advantages and disadvantages of this emotion-focused, transdiagnostic CBT treatment model

-An introduction to the evidence base for the UP

 

Training modalities

Demonstrations, experential exercises, and role-play, with short summaries of the underlying evidence and short clinical examples putting the exercises and demonstrations in the context of a complete UP treatment.

 

References

Farchione et al (2012): Unified Protocol for Transdiagnostic treatment of Emotional Disorders: A Randomized Controlled Trial Behavior Therapy vol 43, issue 3, pp 666-678

Girih-Herrera, E & Ehrenreich-May, J (2014): Using flexible clinical processes in the Unified Protocol for the Treatment of Emotional Disorders in Adolescence Psychotherapy, vol 51(1), pp 117-122

Bilek, E & Ehrenreich-May, J (2012): An Open Trial Investigation of a Transdiagnostic Treatment for Children with Anxiety and Depressive Symtoms Behavior Therapy vol 43, issue 4, pp 887-897

 

Workshop Leaders

Mats Jacobson is a certified therapist, supervisor and trainer in the UP, having had extensive supervision on multiple full UP treatments from CARD, Boston. Mats is also member of the MINT network of MI trainers and a mindfulness instructor. Erik Nilsson is a certified therapist in the UP, having also had training from CARD, Boston. Erik is also conducting a research study on the UP.

 

 

Dr Laura Pass

Affiliation: University of Reading, UK

Title: Brief Behavioural Activation for depressed adolescents

 

Abstract:
Scientific Background and Description of Workshop

Background: Behavioural Activation (BA) is an effective treatment for depression in adults. Current treatment for depression in adolescents is sub-optimal and engagement in standard CBT is challenging. There is a need to develop low intensity treatments for depression that can be offered in a range of settings including schools. We have adapted Brief BA (BATD-R; Lejuez, et al., 2011) for use with adolescents (Pass & Reynolds, 2014).

Brief BA is is designed to be delivered by a range of professionals including those who do not have specialist qualifications or extensive training. In a pilot study of Brief BA with 25 young people with clinically significant symptoms of depression engagement was excellent. Brief BA was acceptable to young people and their parents . Most young people reported clinically significant reductions in symptoms of depression and improved functioning. The therapists delivering Brief BA were from a variety of backgrounds and training, including clinical psychologists, a Psychological Well-being Practitioner (PWP), an assistant psychologist and a trainee clinical psychologist. We are currently piloting the delivery of Brief BA for depression in schools as an alternative referring young people for treatment in specialist mental health services.

Brief BA involves 6-8 weekly sessions, and a 30 minute review session one month later. Key elements of Brief BA for adolescents include:

– A focus on engaging young people in BA

– Scaffolding therapy to match the young person’s emotional and cognitive development

– The involvement of parents

– A focus on identifying young people’s values

– Including problem solving and contracting, with parental involvement

– Session by session workbooks for young people and their parents

This workshop will demonstrate the use of Brief BA with adolescents who are experiencing clinically significant depressive symptoms. It will focus particularly on how to engage young people in treatment, how to identify their values and link values to activities, and how to work with parents and young people. Case examples will be used to highlight specific challenges and techniques. Implications for the everyday clinical practice of CBT Brief BA for depression in adolescents provides a low intensity alternative to current evidence-based psychological therapies. It may also be an appropriate part of a stepped care pathway for depression in adolescents.

Objectives

Participants will acquire the following knowledge and skills:

1. Understand how Brief BA draws on behavioural theory to treat depression in adolescents

2. Engaging depressed young people and their parents or carers in brief Behavioural Activation

3. Helping young people to identify their values in three key areas – self, people that matter and things that matter

4. Linking young people’s values to activities and planning these in to daily life

5. Dealing with conflict and disagreement between young people and parents

 

Modalities

This workshop will be very practically based. Brief BA will be taught through instruction, group discussion, Q&A, modelling through case examples and video clips, and practice (role-plays).

Who the workshop is aimed at

This workshop would be suitable for clinicians who have experience of working with depressed young people in mental health settings. It would also be suitable for clinical staff with experience of Brief Behavioural Activation who would like to adapt it for use with young people.

 

References

Lejuez, C. W., Hopko, D. R., Acierno, R., Daughters, S. B., & Pagoto, S. L. (2011). Ten Year Revision of the Brief Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression (BATD): Revised Treatment Manual (BATD-R). Behavior Modification, 35, 111-161. doi: 10.1177/0145445510390929. Pass, L., & Reynolds, S. (2014).
Treatment manual for Brief Behavioural Activation for Depression in Adolescents (BATD-A). Charlie Waller Institute, University of Reading UK. Pass, L., Brisco, G., & Reynolds, S. (2015). Adapting brief Behavioural Activation (BA) for adolescent depression: a case example. The Cognitive Behaviour Therapist, 8, e17.

 

Workshop Leaders

Dr Laura Pass is a clinical psychologist working at the Charlie Waller Institute at the University of Reading. Her clinical research is focused on understanding depression in young people and developing and adapting evidence based treatments that can be delivered flexibly in a range of
settings.

 

 

.full-width-5a2f8dc048479 { min-height:100px; padding:10px 0 10px; margin-bottom:10px; } #background-layer--5a2f8dc048479 { background-position:left top; background-repeat:repeat; ; }
Contact Us

We're not around right now. But you can send us an email and we'll get back to you, asap.

Not readable? Change text. captcha txt